Strategy and Assets Committee

 

 

Meeting Date:     Tuesday, 13 April, 2021

Location:            Council Chambers, City Administrative Centre, Bridge Road, Nowra

Time:                   5.00pm

 

Membership (Quorum - 5)

Clr John Wells - Chairperson

Clr Bob Proudfoot

All Councillors

Chief Executive Officer or nominee

 

 

 

Please note: The proceedings of this meeting (including presentations, deputations and debate) will be webcast and may be recorded and broadcast under the provisions of the Code of Meeting Practice.  Your attendance at this meeting is taken as consent to the possibility that your image and/or voice may be recorded and broadcast to the public.

 

 

 

Agenda

 

1.    Apologies / Leave of Absence

2.    Confirmation of Minutes

·      Strategy and Assets Committee - 9 March 2021......................................................... 1

3.    Declarations of Interest

4.    Mayoral Minute

5.    Deputations and Presentations

6.    Notices of Motion / Questions on Notice

Notices of Motion / Questions on Notice

SA21.44...... Notice of Motion - Amendment to the NSW Electoral Laws........................ 14

SA21.45...... Notice of Motion - Thompson St Sporting Complex - Supply of Front Deck Mower...................................................................................................................... 16

SA21.46...... Notice of Motion - Proposed Road Closure and Subdivision – Part North Cres, Culburra Beach............................................................................................. 17

SA21.47...... Notice of Motion - Improved Parking Signage - Croobyar Rd, Milton......... 20

SA21.48...... Question on Notice - The River Road, Currowan........................................ 24

 

 

7.    Reports

City Performance

SA21.49...... Draft Delivery Program Operational Plan and Budget 2021-2022 - Public Exhibition...................................................................................................................... 25

SA21.50...... Policy - Petitions to Council.......................................................................... 40

SA21.51...... Council Meeting Dates - Proposed Amendments........................................ 49

SA21.52...... Re-establishment of Alcohol Free Zones - Nowra East, Shoalhaven Heads, Culburra Beach/Orient Point, Mollymook.................................................................... 51

SA21.53...... 2020/2021 Council Borrowings - Loan Agreement - Holiday Haven........... 59

City Futures

SA21.54...... Report Back - Representations - Shoalhaven Hospital Car Parking........... 61

SA21.55...... Nowra-Bomaderry Bypass - Chronology..................................................... 68

SA21.56...... Shoalhaven, the Economic Future............................................................... 81

City Services

SA21.57...... Land Acquisition Matters - Cambewarra Locality........................................ 88

SA21.58...... Proposed Licence - Council as Lessee from Wardens of the Anglican Parish of Ulladulla........................................................................................................ 89

SA21.59...... Appointment of Native Title Manager and Notification to Minister for Planning, Industry & Environment.............................................................................................. 94

SA21.60...... Waste Services - Fees and Charges - Requested Percentage Increase.... 97

SA21.61...... Tenders - Supply Slow Speed Shredder.................................................... 105

SA21.62...... Tender - Hillcrest Avenue South Nowra - Road Rehabilitation................. 106

SA21.63...... Tenders - Demolition & Construction of an Accessible Boardwalk - Ray Brooks Reserve...................................................................................................... 108

SA21.64...... Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre Progress Update................................. 110  

City Lifestyles

SA21.65...... Nowra Showground - Potential Grants and Project Update...................... 113

SA21.66...... Request for Plaques and Memorials - Plaques and Memorials Policy...... 121

SA21.67...... Acceptance of Grant Funding - Everyone Can Play 2020/21 - Variety Livvi's Place Playspace Marriott Park............................................................................. 123

Shoalhaven Water

SA21.68...... Feasibility Report - Provision of Sewer to Tomerong Village.................... 136

SA21.69...... Shoalhaven Water Reclamation Annual Report 2019-20.......................... 141

SA21.70...... Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology - National Performance Report 2019/20 Urban Water Utilities.................................................................... 143

SA21.71...... Evaluation of New Water Recycling Projects - Cost-Benefit Framework.. 159

SA21.72...... Payment of Dividend from Shoalhaven Water 2019-20............................ 165     

8.    Confidential Reports     

Reports

CSA21.4...... Land Acquisition Matters - Cambewarra Locality

Local Government Act - Section 10A(2)(c) - Information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

There is a public interest consideration against disclosure of information as disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional or financial interests.

CSA21.5...... Tenders - Hillcrest Avenue South Nowra - Road Rehabilitation

Local Government Act - Section 10A(2)(d)(i) - Commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

There is a public interest consideration against disclosure of information as disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional or financial interests.

CSA21.6...... Tenders - Supply Slow Speed Shredder

Local Government Act - Section 10A(2)(d)(i) - Commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

There is a public interest consideration against disclosure of information as disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional or financial interests.

CSA21.7...... Tenders - Demolition & Construction of an Accessible Boardwalk - Ray Brooks Reserve

Local Government Act - Section 10A(2)(d)(i) - Commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.

There is a public interest consideration against disclosure of information as disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional, or financial interests.

CSA21.8...... Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre - Progress and Funding

Local Government Act - Section 10A(2)(c) - Information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.

There is a public interest consideration against disclosure of information as disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional or financial interests.

                 


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 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

Page  

 

Strategy and Assets Committee

Delegation:

Pursuant to s377(1) of the Local Government Act 1993 (LG Act) the Committee is delegated the functions conferred on Council by the LG Act any other Act or delegated to Council, as are specified in the Schedule, subject to the following limitations:

i.        The Committee cannot exercise any function delegated to the Council which by the terms of that delegation cannot be sub-delegated;

ii.       The Committee cannot exercise any function which s377(1) of the LG Act provides cannot be delegated by Council;

iii.      The Committee cannot exercise a function which is expressly required by the LG Act or any other Act to be exercised by resolution of the Council; and

iv.      The Committee cannot exercise any function which is a function of the General Manager under s335 of the LG Act.

SCHEDULE

a.   Make recommendations to Council and consider, formulate, review and adopt policies in relation to Council’s corporate & community planning under Part 2 of Chapter 13 of the LG Act, asset management and in connection with the other functions listed in this Schedule and in particular to make recommendations to Council in respect of the content of Council’s community strategic plan, delivery program, operational plan, and resourcing strategy within the meaning of Part 2 of Chapter 13 of the LG Act;

b.   Make recommendations to Council and consider, formulate, review and adopt Council policies, plans and strategies other than those in respect of town planning and environmental matters, and any other matter referred to the Committee by the Chief Executive Officer;

c.   Make recommendations in respect of the introduction of new fees or charges or the alteration of existing fees and charges for inclusion in the Council’s next operational plan within the meaning of s405 of the LG Act;

d.   Monitor, review and consider matters relating to the operations and strategic direction of Council’s Holiday Haven Tourist Parks Group;

e.   All functions in respect of the management of, and facilities provided on Crown Land in respect of which Council is the ‘Crown Land Manager’ under Division 3.4 of the Crown Lands Management Act 2016 and the making of recommendations to Council regarding such matters where the function is not dealt with under the delegations to the Chief Executive Officer or cannot be delegated by Council;

f.    Provision of corporate direction to Shoalhaven Water in respect of powers delegated to it by Council regarding the construction, alteration or maintenance of water and sewerage works, effluent works and pump out removal;

g.   Authorise the expenditure of funds raised under s64 of the LG Act within the limits outlined in, and in accordance with Council’s adopted Development Servicing Plan and other relevant adopted Council policies;

h.   Make recommendations to Council in respect of fees and charges for water and wastewater services provided by Council;

i.    Develop, implement, review and adopt strategic policies for water, sewerage and effluent operations of Council;

j.    Undertake preliminary investigations (feasibility, cost benefit, risk analysis, etc.) into development opportunities for Council’s strategic land holdings and make recommendations to Council;

k.   Review and make recommendations to Council in relation to:

i.      The sale prices of land in connection with residential and industrial Council subdivisions;

ii.     The sale of Council property or the purchase or resumption of land;

iii.    The compensation to be offered in respect of land resumed by Council; and

iv.    Properties leased/rented by Council, or properties leased/rented from Council other than those delegated to the Chief Executive Officer for approval and execution in accordance with MIN14.912 and MIN15.237 of the Council.

Note: MIN14.912 delegates authority to the Chief Executive Officer to approve and execute leases and licences that are for a maximum term of 5 years; and are in accordance with current policies and relevant legislation; and have an annual rental of $5,000 or less; and have not been objected to as a result of the public exhibition process (Community Land).

In addition, MIN14.912 delegates authority to the Chief Executive Officer to approve and execute telecommunications licences where the agreement relates to an existing telecommunication site.

Note: MIN15.237 delegates authority to the Chief Executive Officer to approve and finalise all lease negotiations in relation to the properties now managed by Integrity Real Estate … and to sign any documents necessary to give effect to this resolution.

l.    To determine and accept all tenders with a value of $1 Million or more with the following exceptions (MIN17.334):

i.    Those tenders required by law to be determined by full Council (MIN17.334),

ii.    Those tenders where the recommendation is to not accept any tender (which will be reported directly to Ordinary) (GD19.164).

 

 


 

 

 

 

Minutes of the Strategy and Assets Committee

 

 

Meeting Date:     Tuesday, 9 March 2021

Location:            Council Chambers, City Administrative Centre, Bridge Road, Nowra

Time:                   5.00pm

 

 

The following members were present:

 

Clr John Wells - Chairperson

Clr Amanda Findley

Clr Joanna Gash

Clr Patricia White

Clr Kaye Gartner

Clr Nina Digiglio

Clr Annette Alldrick

Clr John Levett

Clr Andrew Guile – arrived at 5.19pm (Remotely)

Clr Mitchell Pakes – left at 7.14pm

Clr Greg Watson

Clr Mark Kitchener

Clr Bob Proudfoot

Mr Stephen Dunshea - Chief Executive Officer

 

 

 

Apologies / Leave of Absence

Nil

 

 

Confirmation of the Minutes

RESOLVED (Clr White / Clr Gash)                                                                                       MIN21.117

That the Minutes of the Strategy and Assets Committee held on Tuesday 09 February 2021 be confirmed.

CARRIED

 

 

Declarations of Interest

Clr Kitchener – SA21.30 – Notice of Motion – Narrawallee Beach Off Leash Area – significant non pecuniary interest declaration – will leave the room and will not take part in discussion or vote Has become a dog owner and spent much of the summer walking his dog on Narrawallee Beach, which may be perceived by some to constitute a personal interest.

 

 

Mayoral Minutes

 

MMS21.1   Mayoral Minute - Integrated Recreational Plan for Worrigee, South Nowra and East Nowra

HPERM Ref: D21/85164

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council undertakes a strategic review of all recreational and park land that has been set aside in the areas of Worrigee, East Nowra, and South Nowra, with a view to creating an integrated and connected recreational strategic plan. The aim of the plan would be to deliver different recreational offerings across the three precincts and have them connected with a cycle way and way finding, encouraging residents from each of the precincts to seek a new adventure in each of these areas.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Findley / Clr Proudfoot)                                                                             MIN21.118

That Council undertakes a strategic review of all recreational and park land that has been set aside in the areas of Worrigee, East Nowra, and South Nowra, with a view to creating an integrated and connected recreational strategic plan. The aim of the plan would be to deliver different recreational offerings across the three precincts and have them connected with a cycle way and way finding, encouraging residents from each of the precincts to seek a new adventure in each of these areas.

CARRIED

 

 

 

Deputations and Presentations

 

SA21.30 – Notice of Motion – Narrawallee Beach Off Leash Area

Tim Trescowthick - FOR

 

SA21.35 – Drawing Room Rocks

 

Bob Dickinson - FOR

 

SA21.40 – Sanctuary Point District Library – Update and Concept Plan Public Exhibition

Bruce Goldsmith - AGAINST

Kerry Barlow - AGAINST

 

SA21.41 – Acceptance of Community Facilities Grants – Crown Reserves Improvement Fund

Suzanne Hammond Warne (Nowra Show Society Inc) - FOR

Ralph Cook (Nowra Show Society Inc) - FOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notices of Motion / Questions on Notice

 

SA21.28     Notice of Motion - Footpaths - Plunkett Street, Morton Pde and Journal Street Nowra

HPERM Ref: D21/73070

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council investigate the possibility of constructing and connecting footpaths for the residents in the following locations.

1.    Plunkett Street, from Princes Highway to Journal Street.

2.    Morton Parade from Princes Highway to Journal Street.

3.    Journal Street access for pedestrians from Morton Parade to Stockland.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Gash / Clr Digiglio)                                                                                    MIN21.119

That Council investigate the possibility of constructing and connecting footpaths for the residents in the following locations.

1.    Plunkett Street, from Princes Highway to Journal Street.

2.    Morton Parade from Princes Highway to Journal Street.

3.    Journal Street access for pedestrians from Morton Parade to Stockland.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.29     Notice of Motion - Culburra Beach and District Garden Club Inc - COVID-19 Assistance

HPERM Ref: D21/79567

Recommendation

That Council make a $1000 donation to the Culburra Beach and District Garden Club Inc from the unallocated donation vote and the vote be adjusted if necessary, at the next quarterly review.

 

RECOMMENDATION (Clr Watson / Clr Findley)

That Council make a $1000 donation to the Culburra Beach and District Garden Club Inc from the unallocated donation vote and the vote be adjusted if necessary, at the next quarterly review.

CARRIED

 

 

Note: Clr Guile joined the meeting at 5.19pm.

 

SA21.30     Notice of Motion - Narrawallee Beach Off Leash Area

HPERM Ref: D21/80012

Clr Kitchener – significant non pecuniary interest declaration – Has become a dog owner and spent much of the summer walking his dog on Narrawallee Beach, which may be perceived by some to constitute a personal interest. – left the room and did not take part in discussion or vote.

Note: Clr Kitchener left the meeting at 5.19pm.

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.    Support the continuing access to the off-leash area at Narrawallee Beach from Surfers Ave as per the recent trial directions.

2.    Develop appropriate signage directing people the right way to access the off leash area in and around Narrawallee Beach especially at the Surfers Ave end. Clrs Proudfoot and White and available Councillors to assist in the development of the signage with staff.

3.    Leave the access from Surfers Ave in place until consideration of this area in the review of the Access Areas for Dogs policy.

4.    Issue enforcement penalty notices for persons not following the signage or walking with dogs directly across south end Narrawallee Beach between the steps and Victor Ave steps.

5.    Request local residents and Paws4Shoalhaven to assist with advising residents and visitors of the strict entry process from Surfers Ave to the off-leash area.

 

RESOLVED (Clr White / Clr Proudfoot)                                                                               MIN21.120

That Council:

1.    Support the continuing access to the off-leash area at Narrawallee Beach from Surfers Ave as per the recent trial directions.

2.    Develop appropriate signage directing people the right way to access the off leash area in and around Narrawallee Beach especially at the Surfers Ave end. Clrs Proudfoot and White and available Councillors to assist in the development of the signage with staff.

3.    Leave the access from Surfers Ave in place until consideration of this area in the review of the Access Areas for Dogs policy.

4.    Issue enforcement penalty notices for persons not following the signage or walking with dogs directly across south end Narrawallee Beach between the steps and Victor Ave steps.

5.    Request local residents, Paws4Shoalhaven and Rangers to assist with advising residents and visitors of the strict entry process from Surfers Ave to the off-leash area.

6.    Undertake vegetation maintenance if required on mid beach access points as noted in Staff Signage Report

7.    Contact Holiday Home owners via Rates Notices advising them of the changes and the role they play in sharing the foreshore and informing their tenants of the access arrangements for dogs.

8.    Include on the new signage, information on shore bird habitats which is protected by No Dogs (access) areas.

9.    Include on the signage that to access the beach via the track from Surfers Avenue at the back of the beach, dogs must be on leash.

For:             Clr Wells, Clr Findley, Clr Gash, Clr White, Clr Gartner, Clr Digiglio, Clr Alldrick, Clr Levett, Clr Pakes, Clr Watson, Clr Kitchener, Clr Proudfoot and Stephen Dunshea

Against:    Clr Guile

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reports

 

Note: Clr Kitchener returned to the meeting at 6.16pm.

 

SA21.31     Local Government Conference - 2021 National General Assembly of Local Government - Proposed Motions

HPERM Ref: D21/35599

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council

1.    Approve attendance by all interested Councillors at the Australian Local Government Association – 2021 National Assembly, and such attendance be deemed to be Council business.

2.    Travel, registration fees, accommodation and all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses be met in accordance with its adopted policy.

3.    Adopt the proposed motions in the report for submission to the 2021 National Assembly.

4.    Determine any additional motions for submission at this meeting.

5.    That the Mayor be given delegated authority to submit any further proposed motions after consulting with Councillors prior to the deadline for submitting motions.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Watson / Clr Pakes)                                                                                  MIN21.121

That:

1.    Council approve attendance by all interested Councillors at the Australian Local Government Association – 2021 National Assembly, and such attendance be deemed to be Council business.

2.    Travel, registration fees, accommodation and all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses be met in accordance with its adopted policy.

3.    Council adopt the proposed motions in the report for submission to the 2021 National Assembly.

4.    The Mayor be given delegated authority to submit any further proposed motions after consulting with Councillors prior to the deadline for submitting motions.

5.    Clr White be the Council’s Voting Delegate for the Conference.

6.    Clr Findley be the Council’s Alternate Voting Delegate for the Conference.

For:             Clr Wells, Clr White, Clr Guile, Clr Pakes, Clr Watson, Clr Kitchener and Clr Proudfoot

Against:    Clr Findley, Clr Gash, Clr Gartner, Clr Digiglio, Clr Alldrick, Clr Levett and Stephen Dunshea

CARRIED ON THE CASTING OF THE CHAIRPERSON

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SA21.32     Nowra Property - Proposed Offering to the Market

HPERM Ref: D21/49871

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council, in accordance with Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993, consider a separate confidential report in relation to a property matter in Nowra.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Proudfoot / Clr Gash)                                                                                MIN21.122

That Council, in accordance with Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993, consider a separate confidential report in relation to a property matter in Nowra.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.33     Road Dedication pursuant to Section 16 & 17 of the Roads Act 1993 at Little Forest

HPERM Ref: D20/408544

Recommendation

That Council;

1.    Resolve to dedicate the land identified in Attachment 1 (D20/408952) known as Graydons Pointer Road and McLean Road, Little Forest as public road pursuant to Section 16 & 17 of the Roads Act 1993;

2.    Authorise by notice in the Government Gazette the dedication of land known as Graydons Pointer Road and McLean Road, Little Forest in accordance with Section 16 of the Roads Act 1993;

3.    Affix the Common Seal of the Council of the City of Shoalhaven to any documents required to be sealed, otherwise the Chief Executive Officer is authorised to sign any documentation necessary to give effect to this resolution.

 

RECOMMENDATION (Clr Proudfoot / Clr White)

That Council:

1.    Resolve to dedicate the land identified in Attachment 1 (D20/408952) known as Graydons Pointer Road and McLean Road, Little Forest as public road pursuant to Section 16 & 17 of the Roads Act 1993;

2.    Authorise by notice in the Government Gazette the dedication of land known as Graydons Pointer Road and McLean Road, Little Forest in accordance with Section 16 of the Roads Act 1993;

3.    Affix the Common Seal of the Council of the City of Shoalhaven to any documents required to be sealed, otherwise the Chief Executive Officer is authorised to sign any documentation necessary to give effect to this resolution.

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SA21.34     Land Acquisition - Easement for Drainage - Part Lot 1 DP 597342 Worrigee and Part Lot 22 DP 1194601

HPERM Ref: D20/523828

Recommendation

That Council

1.    Acquire by agreement an easement for drainage approximately 6m wide and variable width (subject to survey) over Part Lot 1 DP 597342 Worrigee Road, Worrigee and Part Lot 22 DP1194601 Bennett Place Worrigee;

2.    Agree to pay compensation in the amount of:

a) $25,000 (ex GST) for Lot 1 Worrigee Road Worrigee;

b) $3,000 (ex GST) for Lot 22 Bennett Place Worrigee;

plus, reasonable legal costs associated with the acquisition from Project Number 103425;

3.    Authorise the Common Seal of the Council of the City of Shoalhaven be affixed to any document requiring to be sealed and delegate to the Chief Executive Officer authority to sign any documentation necessary to give effect to this resolution.

 

RECOMMENDATION (Clr Pakes / Clr Levett)

That Council:

1.    Acquire by agreement an easement for drainage approximately 6m wide and variable width (subject to survey) over Part Lot 1 DP 597342 Worrigee Road, Worrigee and Part Lot 22 DP1194601 Bennett Place Worrigee;

2.    Agree to pay compensation in the amount of:

a) $25,000 (ex GST) for Lot 1 Worrigee Road Worrigee;

b) $3,000 (ex GST) for Lot 22 Bennett Place Worrigee;

plus, reasonable legal costs associated with the acquisition from Project Number 103425;

3.    Authorise the Common Seal of the Council of the City of Shoalhaven be affixed to any document requiring to be sealed and delegate to the Chief Executive Officer authority to sign any documentation necessary to give effect to this resolution.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.35     Drawing Room Rocks

HPERM Ref: D20/414190

Recommendation

That Council

1.    Endorse the carparking arrangement on Brogers Creek Road as conceptually described on Plan Reference (D20/461955), as this arrangement seeks to

a.    address the existing informal arrangement that creates access disruption for the owner of 20 Brogers Creek Road, and

b.    improve the ability of NSW emergency services to access the area, and

c.    maintain access to the iconic National Parks and Wildlife Asset – Drawing Room Rock Walking Trail

2.    Approach NPWS seeking their formal endorsement of the concept plans and requesting $10,000 to enable Council to proceed to full design.

3.    Approach the NSW Minister for Energy and Environment and the Member for Kiama, seeking their support for the project and requesting that the State Government provide funding of up to $250,000 to enable construction of the carpark to proceed in the 2021-2022 financial year.

 

RECOMMENDATION (Clr Findley / Clr Alldrick)                                                                                    

That Council:

1.    Endorse the carparking arrangement on Brogers Creek Road as conceptually described on Plan Reference (D20/461955), as this arrangement seeks to

a.    address the existing informal arrangement that creates access disruption for the owner of 20 Brogers Creek Road, and

b.    improve the ability of NSW emergency services to access the area, and

c.    maintain access to the iconic National Parks and Wildlife Asset – Drawing Room Rock Walking Trail

2.    Approach NPWS seeking their formal endorsement of the concept plans and requesting $10,000 to enable Council to proceed to full design.

3.    Approach the NSW Minister for Energy & Environment, the Member for Kiama, Minister for Local Government, Minister for Planning & Public Spaces seeking their support for the project and requesting that the State Government provide funding of up to $250,000 to enable construction of the carpark to proceed in the 2021-2022 financial year.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.36     Update Landfill Gas Services West Nowra

HPERM Ref: D21/7943

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That the report on the finalisation of the Landfill Gas Services Contract be received for information.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Wells / Clr Gartner)                                                                                   MIN21.123

That report on the finalisation of the Landfill Gas Services Contract be received for information.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.37     Tenders - Supply of Linen Hire and Laundering Services to all 12 Holiday Haven Parks.

HPERM Ref: D21/18785

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council consider a separate confidential report in accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Gash / Clr Pakes)                                                                                      MIN21.124

That Council consider a separate confidential report in accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993.

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

 

SA21.38     Exemption from Resolution MIN21.30 and recommencement of Debt Collection - Holiday Haven

HPERM Ref: D21/85304

Recommendation

That Holiday Haven be granted exemption from the suspension of debt recovery action as adopted by Council in January 2021.

 

RECOMMENDATION (Clr Gash / Clr Levett) 

That Holiday Haven be granted exemption from the suspension of debt recovery action as adopted by Council in January 2021.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.39     Acceptance of Cricket Grants - Boongaree

HPERM Ref: D21/65903

Clr Wells – less than significant non pecuniary interest declaration – his grandson plays 2nd Grade for Berry – remained the room and took part in discussion and voted.

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.    Accept the NSW ICC T20 World Cup 2020 Legacy Fund offer of $34,162.

2.    Accept the Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund offer of $30,000.

3.    Authorise the CEO to sign the funding agreements from the two funding bodies. 

 

RESOLVED (Clr Findley / Clr Gartner)                                                                                MIN21.125

That Council:

1.    Accept the NSW ICC T20 World Cup 2020 Legacy Fund offer of $34,162.

2.    Accept the Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund offer of $30,000.

3.    Authorise the CEO to sign the funding agreements from the two funding bodies. 

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.40     Sanctuary Point District Library - Update and Concept Plan Public Exhibition

HPERM Ref: D21/66387

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.    Accept the report for information.

2.    Support the public exhibition of the Sanctuary Point District Library Concept Plan.

a.    Where significant and adverse feedback is received, amend the design to address the issues raised as deemed necessary.

3.    Receive a further report at the conclusion of the public exhibition period

4.    Endorse progressing to Development Application lodgement as per MIN20.33.

 

 

 

RESOLVED (Clr Proudfoot / Clr Findley)                                                                             MIN21.126

That:

1.    Council accept the report for information.

2.    Council support the public exhibition of the Sanctuary Point District Library Concept Plan.

a.    Where significant and adverse feedback is received, amend the design to address the issues raised as deemed necessary.

3.    Council receive a further report at the conclusion of the public exhibition period.

4.    Council endorse progressing to Development Application lodgement as per MIN20.33.

5.    The construction of a new amenities block at Frances Ryan Reserve continue to be in the forefront of Council’s plan.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.41     Acceptance of Community Facilities Grants - Crown Reserves Improvement Fund

HPERM Ref: D21/77194

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council

1.    Accept the Crown Reserves Improvement Fund offers of:

a.    $8,000 for Culburra Tennis Courts

b.    $89,689 for Nowra Showground

c.    $15,000 for Milton Pony Club

2.    Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to sign the funding agreements with the NSW Government for the above projects.

3.    Commit to provision of funding from:

a.    The 2021 / 22 Active Recreation Minor Improvement budget of $28,060 for Culburra Beach Tennis Courts

b.    The 2021 / 22 Recreation Buildings budget of $11,188 for Nowra Showground audio system

4.    Write to thank the Minister the Hon Melinda Pavey MP, NSW Minister for Water Property & Housing for her generous offers from the NSW Crown Reserves Improvement Fund.

 

Note: Clr Proudfoot left the meeting at 6.49pm

RESOLVED (Clr Pakes / Clr Gartner)                                                                                  MIN21.127

That Council:

1.    Accept the Crown Reserves Improvement Fund offers of:

a.    $8,000 for Culburra Tennis Courts

b.    $89,689 for Nowra Showground

c.    $15,000 for Milton Pony Club

2.    Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to sign the funding agreements with the NSW Government for the above projects.

3.    Commit to provision of funding from:

 

a.    The 2021 / 22 Active Recreation Minor Improvement budget of $28,060 for Culburra Beach Tennis Courts

b.    The 2021 / 22 Recreation Buildings budget of $11,188 for Nowra Showground audio system

4.    Write to thank the Minister the Hon Melinda Pavey MP, NSW Minister for Water Property & Housing for her generous offers from the NSW Crown Reserves Improvement Fund.

CARRIED

 

 

SA21.42     Sustainable Energy Management Update

HPERM Ref: D21/55753

Note: Clr Proudfoot returned to the meeting at 6.51pm.

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That the Committee receive the Energy Management Update report for information.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Gartner / Clr Pakes)                                                                                  MIN21.128

That the Committee receive the Energy Management Update report for information.

CARRIED

 

 

Introduction of Items as Matters of Urgency

RESOLVED (Clr Watson / Clr Findley)                                                                                 MIN21.129

That the following addendum reports be introduced as matters of urgency:

1.       SA21.43 COVID-19 Contributions Discount Subsidy Policy - Proposed Amendments

CARRIED

The Chairperson ruled the matter as one of urgency as it relates to urgent business of Council and allowed its introduction.

 

 

 

Addendum Reports

 

SA21.43     COVID-19 Contributions Discount Subsidy Policy - Proposed Amendments

HPERM Ref: D21/92206

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council: 

1.    Endorse the recommended amendments to the COVID-19 Contributions Discount Subsidy Policy (POL20/23) as outlined within the report to enact the changes in MIN21.116.

2.    Extend the review date of the Policy by one additional year to 7 March 2022.

3.    If a period of public notice is required to facilitate Parts 1 and 2, commence this in accordance with legislative requirements as soon as possible and if any submissions are received that these be considered in a further report to enable the finalisation of the Policy.  If no submissions are received, proceed to finalise the amendment to the Policy as notified, without any further reports.

4.    If a period of public notice is not required, immediately make the amendment to the Policy as per this resolution, without any further reports.

 

RESOLVED (Clr Watson / Clr Pakes)                                                                                  MIN21.130

That Council:

1.    Endorse the recommended amendments to the COVID-19 Contributions Discount Subsidy Policy (POL20/23) as outlined within the report to enact the changes in MIN21.116.

2.    Extend the review date of the Policy by one additional year to 7 March 2022.

3.    If a period of public notice is required by law before adoption of the amendment to the Policy, provide the require public notice in accordance with legislative requirements as soon as possible and if any submissions are received that these be considered in a further report to enable the finalisation of the Policy.  If no submissions are received in response to the public notification, the amendment to the Policy is taken to be adopted without any further reports at the end of the period for submissions.

4.    If a period of public notice is not required, the amendment to the Policy is taken to be adopted without any further reports.

For:             Clr Wells, Clr Findley, Clr Gash, Clr White, Clr Digiglio, Clr Alldrick, Clr Levett, Clr Guile, Clr Pakes, Clr Watson, Clr Kitchener, Clr Proudfoot and Stephen Dunshea

Against:    Clr Gartner

CARRIED

 

 

 

Confidential Reports

 

Pursuant to Section 10A(4) the public were invited to make representation to the meeting before any part of the meeting is closed, as to whether that part of the meeting should be closed.

 

No members of the public made representations.

 

RESOLVED (Clr White / Clr Digiglio)                                                                                   MIN21.131

That the press and public be excluded from the Meeting, pursuant to section 10A(1)(a) of the Local Government Act, 1993, to consider the following items of a confidential nature.

                       

CSA21.2         Nowra Property - Proposed Offering to the Market

Information that would, if disclosed, confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom the Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business.10(A)(2)(c)

There is a public interest consideration against disclosure of information as disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional, or financial interests.

CSA21.3         Tenders - Supply of Linen Hire & Laundering for all 12 Holiday Haven Parks

Commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it.10(A)(2)(d)(i)

There is a public interest consideration against disclosure of information as disclosure of the information could reasonably be expected to undermine competitive neutrality in connection with any functions of an agency in respect of which it competes with any person or otherwise place an agency at a competitive advantage or disadvantage in any market.

CARRIED

 

 

Note: Clr Pakes left the meeting at 7.14pm.

 

The meeting moved into confidential the time being 7.14pm.

 

The meeting moved into open session, the time being 7.15pm.

 

 

Report from confidential session

 

The following resolutions of the meeting, whilst closed to the public, were made public.

 

CSA21.3    Tenders - Supply of Linen Hire & Laundering for all 12 Holiday Haven Parks

HPERM Ref: D21/18910

RESOLVED                                                                                                                        MIN21.132C

That:

1.    Council accept the Tender from Alsco Pty Ltd for the Supply of Linen Hire and Laundering Services to all Holiday Haven Parks for a period of three (3) years from 1 March 2021.

2.    The contract documents and any other associated documents be executed on behalf of the Council in accordance with cl165 of the Local Government Regulation by the General Manager.

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

There being no further business, the meeting concluded, the time being 7.16pm.

 

 

Clr Wells

CHAIRPERSON

 

 

 

 


 

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SA21.44     Notice of Motion - Amendment to the NSW Electoral Laws

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/121974

 

Submitted by:    Clr Greg Watson   

Purpose / Summary

The following Notice of Motion, of which due notice has been given, is submitted for Council’s consideration.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council make representations to the Hon. Shelley Hancock MP, Minister for Local Government requesting Mrs Hancock to extend the prohibition in respect of individuals elected to Local Government from holding two (2) elected positions by including the Commonwealth Parliament of Australia in the prohibitions in the Legislation.

 

 

Background

This prohibition already exists in respect of the NSW Parliament. The further extension of this provision is logical to further discourage ambitious individuals using Local Government as a plaything as they seek to further their egocentric ambitions.

 

Note by the CEO

Section 275 of the Local Government Act, 1993 outlines the following disqualifications for persons holding civic office (including election as a Councillor or Mayor):

275 Who is disqualified from holding civic office?

(1) A person is disqualified from holding civic office--

(a)          while disqualified from being an elector, or

(a1)   while a member of the Parliament of New South Wales, except as provided by subsections (5) and (7), or

(b)          while a judge of any court of the State or the Commonwealth, or

(c)     while serving a sentence (including a sentence the subject of an intensive correction order) for a serious indictable offence or any other offence, except a sentence imposed for a failure to pay a fine, or

(d)          if he or she is while holding that office, or has been within 2 years before                           nomination for election, election or appointment to the office, convicted of an                     offence under the regulations made for the purposes of section 748(3), or

(e)     if he or she is while holding that office, or has been within 7 years before nomination for election, election or appointment to the office, convicted in New South Wales of an offence that is punishable by imprisonment for 5 years or more, or convicted in another State or Territory, or under a law of the Commonwealth, of an offence that, if committed in New South Wales, would be an offence so punishable, or

(e1) if he or she is while holding that office, or has been within 2 years before nomination for election, election or appointment to the office, convicted of an offence under the Election Funding, Expenditure and Disclosures Act 1981 or the Electoral Funding Act 2018 that is punishable by imprisonment for 2 years or more, or

(f)      while a surcharge, payable by the person under Part 5 of Chapter 13 and not paid within 6 months after it became payable, remains unpaid, or

(g)     while disqualified from holding a civic office under a provision of this Act or Part 4A of the Crimes Act 1900 (Corruptly receiving commissions and other corrupt practices), or

(h)     while disqualified from managing a corporation under Part 2D.6 of the Corporations Act 2001 of the Commonwealth.

(1A) If--

(a)     an order for suspension from civic office for misconduct is made (after the commencement of this subsection) against a person under this Act by the Departmental Chief Executive or the Civil and Administrative Tribunal on a referral from the Departmental Chief Executive, and

(b)     it is the third or subsequent such order that has been made against the person (including orders made before the commencement of this subsection), the person is disqualified from holding civic office for 5 years after the date the order takes effect.

(2)     A person is disqualified from holding civic office on a council if he or she is an employee of the council or holds an office or place of profit under the council.

(3)     A person is not disqualified from holding a civic office only because, while holding the civic office, the person ceases to be a resident in the area, to own property in the area or to be an occupier or ratepaying lessee of rateable land in the area.

(4)     A person is taken not to be disqualified from holding civic office if the former Administrative Decisions Tribunal or the Civil and Administrative Tribunal, in proceedings under section 329, has refused to order the dismissal of the person in circumstances to which subsection (4) of that section applies.

(5) If--

(a)     on the commencement of this subsection, a member of the Parliament of New    South Wales is a councillor or mayor, or

(b)     after the commencement of this subsection, a councillor or mayor becomes a member of the Parliament of New South Wales,

the person is not disqualified from holding civic office because of subsection (1) (a1) for the balance of the person's term of office as a councillor or for the period of 2 years (whichever is the shorter period).

(6)     Subsection (5) does not apply where a councillor or mayor becomes a member of the Parliament of New South Wales after the commencement of that subsection and within 12 months after last ceasing to be a member of that Parliament.

(7)     Despite anything to the contrary in this Chapter, a member of the Parliament of New South Wales is not disqualified because of subsection (1)(a1) from being nominated for election or being elected to a civic office. If elected, the person is disqualified from holding that civic office unless--

(a)     the person has ceased to be a member of that Parliament before the first meeting of the council concerned after the election, or

(b)     it is an election as mayor by the councillors during the period that the person is not disqualified by the operation of subsection (5).

Note : If a person while holding civic office becomes subject to disqualification under this section, the office becomes vacant under section 234.

 

Section 276 of the Local Government Act, 1993 outlines that with respect to elections of new Councillors the effect of a disqualification arising from the Section 276 above, means that the person “Cannot be elected or appointed to Civic Office”.

 

Sections 43 and  44 of The Constitution outlines the provisions which disqualify individuals of the Houses of Parliament of the Commonwealth. There is no specific disqualification for persons holding Civic Office in Local Government.

 


 

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SA21.45     Notice of Motion - Thompson St Sporting Complex - Supply of Front Deck Mower

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/122842

 

Submitted by:    Clr Greg Watson   

Purpose / Summary

The following Notice of Motion, of which due notice has been given, is submitted for Council’s consideration.

 

Recommendation

That:

1.    Council supply a front deck mower, type to be determined by Director City Services, for the use of the Thompson Sporting Complex Committee in maintaining the grounds.

2.    The funds for the acquisition to be sourced from the Plant Replacement Reserve or other source, as determined by the CEO.

 

 

Background

The present tractor and mower have after 30 years reached the end of their useful life. Breakdowns frequently require committee members to use their personal mowers to maintain the fields which is a very unsatisfactory situation.

 


 

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SA21.46     Notice of Motion - Proposed Road Closure and Subdivision – Part North Cres, Culburra Beach

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/132820

 

Submitted by:    Clr John Levett   

Purpose / Summary

The following Notice of Motion, of which due notice has been given, is submitted for Council’s consideration.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That:

1.    Council halts all works on the Council owned green space which has been identified as surplus Council land on the northern side of North Crescent between the Lake Circuit and Marina Lane. 

2.    The CEO bring back to the earliest appropriate meeting a report which covers the following issues:

a.    Proposed plans for the “Green Space” including capital works, land clearing, subdivisions, extent of the original community consultation and the associated time frames.

b.    An environmental impact statement and cost benefit analysis for the planned project.

c.    Suggestions for possible alternative uses of this land including the recategorisation of it as Community Land and the creation of a nature reserve.

d.    A Consultation Plan which might include CCBs, tourism bodies and the wider Culburra community.

e.    How far the project has progressed and the options to reconsider it.

 

 

Background

In October 2018 Council resolved (MIN18.861), as the roads authority, to close the surplus road reserve adjacent to the formed alignment of North Crescent at Culburra Beach. The area in question is shown on the following aerial photo to the left of North Crescent - it is made up of three discrete areas between Marina Lane / Allerton Avenue / Allerton Lane / The Lake Circuit.

 

 

The intent of the road closure is to enable a 5 lot residential subdivision for Council to sell and invest in future road projects. In this regard it is noted that the subject land is zoned R2 General Residential and a subdivision of this nature is permissible with consent. This intention was clear in the Council report dated 16 October 2018.

Staff have acted on the road closure in accordance with the Council resolution and it is close to finalisation. This has involved notifications to adjacent owners and more broadly. There have also been formal agreements reached with adjacent owners regarding boundary adjustments associated with the road closure process.

The road closure will include the construction of kerb and guttering and drainage work.

The subsequent subdivision of the land would be subject to a development application and separate Council approval for the five lots.

“At this stage, no development application (DA) has been submitted for the envisaged 5 lot residential subdivision. However when this occurs there will be the opportunity for adjoining owners/residents and the broader community to again comment on the development that is being proposed including vegetation removal.

“Whilst Council is always willing to consider opportunities for improved outcomes, at this point Council is committed to proceeding further with this proposal and has expended resultant funding. Any future sale and/or development of the subject land will rely on subsequent processes.”

Gordon Clark, Strategic Planning Manager, 15 March 2021

This proposed subdivision will be directly across the road from the beach entrance. The existing area of remnant bushland is largely original native vegetation with mature trees and extensive understorey. What invasive species are there could be removed relatively easily under the supervision of a Council Bushcare Group.

Visiting wildlife include Bower Birds, Wrens, Micro Bats, Ospreys, White Breasted Sea Eagles and Echidnas. Notification of Council’s intention has not ranged beyond the nearby affected properties and there is no evidence of wider community consultation. Should the West Culburra Development go ahead the importance of the preservation of valuable bushland pockets in the face of declining urban tree cover in the Shoalhaven will increase. This land is part of a narrow corridor of remnant bushland linking Lakeside Park on Lake Wollumboola to the hind dune vegetation at Tilbury Cove.

To my knowledge there has been no cost benefit analysis undertaken for this project to determine the net monetary benefit to Council.

Such analysis would likely include:

·    Value of staff time involved in the process and expenditure on consultant fees.

·    Estimates of capital works to provide water, power, curb and guttering to both sides of North Crescent which will include drainage improvements, parking and other subdivision expenses, plus marketing and legal costs to prepare the land for sale.

Council sees this as a “commercial opportunity” and the net monetary benefit to Shoalhaven ratepayers when all blocks are sold is relatively easy to quantify.

What isn’t easy to estimate is the ongoing intrinsic worth of the bushland as a quiet space for passive recreation into the future, on a rapidly developing peninsula.

 

 


 

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SA21.47     Notice of Motion - Improved Parking Signage - Croobyar Rd, Milton

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/132942

 

Submitted by:    Clr Kaye Gartner 

Attachments:     1.  Photographs

2.  Letter from Milton Promotions Committee   

Purpose / Summary

The following Notice of Motion, of which due notice has been given, is submitted for Council’s consideration.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council

1.    Improve the signage for legal parking requirements on Croobyar Rd along the border of Milton Showground by:

a.    Increasing the size and frequency of signage.

b.    Ensure signage is affixed to immoveable structures Further, that Council write to Milton Promotions Committee advising how those with fines can appeal them due to inadequate signage.

2.    Write to Milton Promotions Committee advising how those with fines can appeal them due to inadequate signage.

 

 

Background

On March 6th, many vehicles were fined on Croobyar Road for parking illegally i.e. front to the showground fence.

Cars were fined for not parking Rear to Kerb, despite the fact there is no kerb. They were mostly parked Front to kerb as the picture shows.

At the time I received representations from residents who were fined. Recently, Carol Joyce President, Milton Promotions Committee, wrote to Council about this same issue; her letter is attached.

The signage which indicates how cars can legally parked is inadequate. On March 6th, the day fines were issued, some signs were illegible or reversed and so not even on view.

On any day, the signs are too small and too far apart to read in time to begin backing up your car.

This small improvement will enable Milton Promotions Committee to confidently promote events that raise income for the Showground, provide an economic outlet for local stallholders and an enjoyable shopping or family fun events for locals and tourists like.

 


 

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SA21.48     Question on Notice - The River Road, Currowan

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/126803

 

Submitted by:    Clr Kaye Gartner   

Question

The River Road is a Council road which is used on a regular basis by residents living in the Shallow Crossing / Brooman / Mogood area. Tourists also visit Shallow Crossing and surrounds so there is always a bit of traffic on this road especially during holiday time.

1.    Is SCC aware of the current extent of use of The River Rd Currowan by logging trucks?

2.    Is SCC aware of the number of near misses between road users and logging trucks in recent months?

3.    Does SCC consider the mix of residents, tourists and logging trucks advisable?

4.    Has SCC increased its maintenance schedule for The River Rd in the face of increased use by logging trucks?

 

 

 

Response

A report addressing the questions will submitted to a future Strategy & Assets Committee meeting.

 

  


 

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SA21.49     Draft Delivery Program Operational Plan and Budget 2021-2022 - Public Exhibition

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/80866

 

Department:       Corporate Performance & Reporting

Approver:           Kevin Voegt, Director - City Performance 

Attachments:     1.  Draft Delivery Program & Operational Plan & Budget 2021-2022 (councillors information folder)

2.  Draft Delivery Program & Operational Plan & Budget 2021-2022 - Fees & Charges (Part 1) (councillors information folder)

3.  Draft Delivery Program & Operational Plan & Budget 2021-2022 - Fees & Charges (Part 2) (councillors information folder)   

Reason for Report

To provide Council with the Draft Delivery Program and Operational Plan (DPOP) and Draft Budget and Draft Fees and Charges for 2021/22, and to seek the endorsement of Council to place these documents on public exhibition, in accordance with legislative requirements.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.   Endorse the 2021/22 Draft Delivery Program and Operational Plan, Budget, Fees and Charges for the purpose of placing on public exhibition for a period of 28 days.

2.   Approve the Ministers allowable limit of a 2.6% increase (2% rate peg plus 0.6% SRV catch-up) in 2021/22 to the notional yield as permitted by Section 511 of the Local Government Act 1993.

3.   Maintain the 2020/21 rating structure, comprising both base and ad valorem amounts noting that the use of a base amount results in bringing the higher and lower values closer together and in effect spreads the burden across the board to all ratepayers – noting also that this is a commonly used rating structure that is considered to provide the fairest and most equitable distribution of the rate levy across the LGA. 

4.   In accordance with Section 566(3) of the Act, endorse the rate of interest payable on overdue rates and charges for the period 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022 (inclusive) to be 1.5% per annum. It is noted that this is significantly lower than the 2020 OLG recommended maximum of 7%. Interest charges will continue to be waived for ratepayers that are experiencing financial hardship and apply for financial assistance under Council’s Hardship Policy.

5.   Note that the proposed Waste Fees and Charges for 2021/22 have been included in the Draft DPOP and are tabled to Council for endorsement in a separate report to this Strategy & Assets Committee Meeting.

6.   Receive a report on feedback from the community on the Draft 2021/22 DPOP and Budget following the 28 days public exhibition period.

 

 

Options

1.    Council resolves to place the Draft DPOP, Budget and Fees and Charges for 2021/22, on public exhibition for 28 days inclusive with the 2.6% rates increase as recommended.

Implications: The documents will be placed on public exhibition as presented in the report with a report back to a Council in early June with details of submissions received including any community feedback on the inclusion of 0.6% SRV increase in the Draft DPOP.

 

2.    Council resolves to place the Draft DPOP, Budget and Fees and Charges for 2021/22, on public exhibition for 28 days with the Council Resolution on:

a.    the full 4.98% SRV rates increase which will provide an additional $1 million of revenue to fund additional works, services and/or infrastructure projects.

b.    2% rate peg rates increase which will not be sufficient to fund increase in recurrent operational costs.

c.    Council nominating an alternate rate increase noting that each percent reduction from the recommended 2.6% increase would equate to a reduction in revenue of $0.8 million.

d.    Other amendments to the draft 2021/22 DPOP, Budget and Fees & Charges as determined by Council.

Implications: Council would need to provide direction to staff in relation to the necessary budget adjustments to accommodate the recommended alternate rate increase. Ideally, options in this regard should be placed on public exhibition with the DPOP documents presented in this report.

 

Background

In accordance with the Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) requirements in the Local Government Act, Council has developed a Delivery Program for the period 2017-2022, extended by one year due to the delay in local government elections. The Delivery Program 2017-2022, inclusive of the draft Operational Plan and Budget 2021/22, is presented to Council for endorsement for public exhibition.

Council developed, exhibited, and adopted an accompanying Resourcing Strategy in 2017. The Strategy contains the Workforce Plan, Asset Management Plan and the Long-Term Financial Plan.

To allow for the efficient preparation of the 2021/22 draft budget and to facilitate greater transparency and alignment with Council’s strategic priorities, Council adopted the following budget strategy and economic parameters at the December Strategy and Assets Committee meeting. The draft 2021-22 budget was prepared in accordance with Council’s adopted


 

Budget Strategic Principles as outlined below:

Adopted Budget Strategy/Parameter

Achieved

The budget will not result in an unrestricted cash deficit.

P

Maintain or improve Council’s financial and asset management performance indicators reported in the annual financial statements.

P

Maintain an adequate working funds balance.

P

Rates are increased by 2.6% to cover known additional costs in 2021/22 with the additional loan repayments funded from reduced capital expenditure

P

User fees and charges are increased by 2%

P

Salaries and wages will be increased by 2%

P

Materials and other expenditures increased by 0.50%

P

The capital works program has the same level of general funding as 2020/21, with the additional loan repayments for the new loans in 2020/21 funded from this allocation

 

P

Prioritise funding in the following order:

i.     Provide sufficient funding for all continuing services

ii.     Continue Council’s commitment to asset renewal

iii.    Continue a program of capital improvements at similar budget levels and ratios

iv.   Provide funding for recommended service expansions

 

P

b.    Should the need arise during the year for additional borrowings, the following options in priority order will be considered:

i.      Internal borrowing opportunities

ii.     Low-cost loan initiative

iii.    External loans not subsidised by the low-cost loan initiative

P

 

Council Priorities

The Delivery Program details what activities Council intends to undertake in order to achieve the key priorities from the Community Strategic Plan (Shoalhaven 2027). These priorities are grouped under the Key Themes of: 

·    Resilient, Safe and inclusive communities

·    Sustainable, liveable environments

·    Prosperous communities

·    Responsible Governance

The combined Delivery Program and Operational Plan (DPOP) outlines the projects and services Council will deliver under each of the priorities identified by the community.

Major Projects and Key Initiatives

Projects outlined in the draft DPOP 2021-22 have an emphasis on ongoing economic recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and an ambitious $230 million capital works program as part of a consolidated $496 million budget. Full details on Council’s planned major projects and initiatives are included in Attachment 1 – Draft Delivery Program Operation Plan 2021-22.

Major project highlights include:

·    Sanctuary Point Library – finalise the detailed design and pursue further funding opportunities to enable construction to commence.

·    Boongaree Berry – Pump Track, Skate Park construction and delivery.

·    Shoalhaven Community and Recreation Precinct (SCaRP) - Artie Smith Oval and Old Bomaderry Stadium Redesign.

·    Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) developed, constructed and commissioned.

·    Bioelektra Resource Recovery Facility with development assessment approval, EPA licence obtained, and construction commenced.

·    Nowra Riverfront Precinct progressing with proposed urban design and land use planning changes which will enable redevelopment of this key city precinct.

·    Continue important work on the Far North Collector Road to help bust traffic congestion and accommodate future housing growth.

·    Moss Vale Road Urban Release Areas progressed with progressing detailed planning controls, construction of sewer and water infrastructure and the investigation and design of open space to serve a new community.

 

Key Initiatives

·    Prepare a Shoalhaven Live Music Action Plan and ‘Live and Local’ microfestivals.

·    Investigate development of a Shoalhaven Children’s Festival.

·    Review and update the Access Areas for Dogs Policy including signage and guide.

·    Investigate library service options for Sussex Inlet.

·    Provide a range of programs to activate Destination Parks and Showgrounds across each precinct.

 

Focus on Recovery and Resilience

Ongoing actions include:

·    Working with partners to implement initiatives which encourage help-seeking and to build community understanding of mental health issues and available supports.

·    Supporting the development of a long term Community-led Resilience Plan.

·    Implementation of the updated Shoalhaven Adaptation Plan.

·    Encouragement of business growth and job creation in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

·    Engagement to improve community understanding of emergency management arrangements.

 

Performance targets

Performance targets against each Operational Plan Action have been included to ensure that Council continues to be accountable against the goals that have been set and in order to better manage community expectations.

Targets have been updated and reviewed based on returning to business under the new COVID-19 operating environment and based on the estimated ‘business-as-usual’ operation. This includes metrics such as visitor numbers at Council facilities such as the Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre or aquatic and leisure centres. Quarterly reporting will state any influence the pandemic response has on these targets.

 

Revenue Policy

2021/22 Rates Increase

In 2010, the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal of New South Wales (IPART) was delegated responsibility for determining the allowable annual increase in local government general rates income. Shoalhaven City Council was declared as a Fit for the Future Council by the NSW State Government in 2015. This was based on a Council submission provided to the Office of Local Government (OLG) and IPART which outlined several actions the Council would undertake to improve its financial sustainability. 

To ensure consistency with our Long-Term Financial Plan (LTFP) and to meet our Fit for the Future benchmarks, Council successfully applied to IPART in February 2018 for an SRV for each of the three financial years: 2018/19; 2019/20 and 2020/21.  

The Special Rates Variation (SRV) was approved to allow the Council to improve its financial sustainability, fund capital expenditure, reduce its infrastructure backlog, reduce its operating deficit and fund asset renewal and maintenance.

As per IPART determination, in 2020/21 Shoalhaven City Council could increase rates by maximum 5% (2.6% rate peg plus 2.4% increase in addition to the rate peg as per approved SRV). However, considering unprecedented times of COVID-19 pandemic, Shoalhaven City Council did not take up full SRV and increased rates by 2.6% (rate peg only). According to the Local Government Act 1993, Council has up to 10 years to catch-up on any Special Rates Variation increase that wasn’t taken up in previous years.

According to the budget parameters approved by the Council in December 2020, the 2021/22 Draft Budget includes a 2.6% rates increase (rate peg 2.0% plus 0.6% part of SRV catch-up) in 2021/22.

Indicatively, a 2.6% increase (2% rate peg plus 0.6% SRV) in the Council’s 2021/22 rates will generate an additional $2.1 million of revenue that will allow the Council to continue to deliver the services and infrastructure that seek to manage community needs and expectations.

It is important to note that IPART determines an annual rate peg increase based on the Local Government Cost Index (LGCI). The LGCI is a measure of movements in the unit costs incurred by NSW councils for ordinary council activities funded from general rate revenue. As such, the purpose of the rate peg is to compensate councils for the increase in their operational costs and it is required to fund ongoing operational expenditures of councils in NSW.

The 2% rate peg increase will generate $1.6 million of additional revenue for the Council and will be fully utilised to absorb increases in salaries and wages as per Local Government Award. 

Council already generates $11.5 million of SRV income and an additional 0.6% SRV rates increase ($480k) in 2021/22 will be allocated to fund essential SRV Roads and Transport Renewals Program.

The total SRV income above the actual rate peg for 2020/21 and proposed allocation for 2021/22 (including 0.6% increase) is summarised in the table below.

 

 

2020/21 SRV Levied ($)

2021/22 SRV
Funding Allocation ($)

Borrowing cost - Verons Estate infrastructure

 68,503

 65,662

Allow Council to cover the cost of existing service levels

 3,036,916

 2,838,413

Fund New / Enhanced Service Levels

 

 

Additional Maintenance - Roads

 630,375

 642,983

Additional Maintenance - Buildings

 210,125

 214,328

Additional Maintenance - Parks & Reserves

 210,125

 214,328

Additional Operations

 2,091,000

 2,143,275

Capital Expenses

 

 

Roads and Transport Renewals

 2,371,293

 3,895,845

Streetscape renewal

 525,313

 535,819

Sports Grounds Upgrades

 224,446

 535,819

Public Amenities

 314,000

 

Buildings Renewals

 1,781,000

 1,081,000

Loan Repayments

 

 

Principal Repayments -
Verons Estate Infrastructure

 80,478

 83,319

TOTAL

 11,543,574

 12,250,791

 

Proposed 2021/22 Rates Structure

It is recommended that Council maintain the 2021/22 rating structure, comprising both base and ad valorem amounts. The use of a base amount brings the higher and lower values closer together and in effect spreads the burden across the board to all ratepayers. This is a common rating structure and is considered to provide the fairest and most equitable distribution of the rate levy across the LGA. 

The rating structure has a flat base amount of $661.00, with the exception of Residential – Non-Urban category that has a base of $48.00 and Business – Ordinary category that does not have a base amount and is subject to an ad valorem rate in the dollar levied on the value of the property supplied by the Valuer General of NSW.

The following rates are proposed for 2021/22 in respect of each category of ordinary rate levied by the Council.

·    Residential Rates: Will be levied a base amount of $672 and an ad valorem rate of 0.18218 cents in the $ for Ordinary Residential Rates and a base amount of $48 and ad valorem of 0.18218 cents in the $ for Residential Non-Urban Rates.

·    Farmland: The rates for both Farmland and Dairy Farmland will be levied a base amount of $672 and an ad valorem rate of 0.1510 and 0.07690 cents in the $, respectively.

·    Business: All sub-categories will utilise the same base amount of $672.00, excluding Business Permit (Ordinary – Business category), where no base amount is applied given the type of properties within this category.  However, different ad valorems have been applied, depending on the level of service provided in each area. An ad valorem rate for Nowra CBD business rates is 0.56400 cents in the dollar, Business Permit 0.37503 and Business Commercial Industrial 0.26400.

Interest on Overdue Rates & Charges

In response to the financial impacts faced by the community as a result of the COVID-19 Pandemic and in accordance with section 566(3) of the Act, it is recommended that the rate of interest payable on overdue rates and charges for the period 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022 (inclusive) to be 1.5% per annum which is significantly lower than last year’s OLG recommended maximum of 7%. Interest charges will continue to be waived for the ratepayers that experience financial hardship and apply for the financial assistance under the Council Hardship Policy.

Council won’t charge interest on overdue rates and charges until 30 June 2021 and introduction of nominal 1.5% interest in 2021/22 financial year will encourage ratepayers that can afford to pay rates to make payments on time, while interest will be waived for the ratepayers who experience financial difficulties and who can contact the Council regarding any difficultly in paying rates. 

 

Budget Summary

Income Statement by Fund

 

 

($‘000)

General
Fund

Water
Fund

Sewer
Fund

Consol.

Income from Continuing Operations

303,662

29,718

55,952

331,861

Expenses from Continuing Operations

249,739

29,314

42,493

265,724

Net Surplus

53,920

404

13,459

66,134

Net Surplus/(Deficit) before Capital

(737)

(446)

10,109

7,277

Net Cash Movement

(49,951)

(14,960)

(10,047)

(74,958)

Net Reserve Movement

(49,951)

(14,960)

(10,047)

(74,958)

Net Unrestricted Cash Movement

0

0

0

0

 

The proposed Draft 2021/22 Budget includes an ambitious capital expenditure of $230 million across General, Water and Sewer funds along with the $265 million of operating expenditures required to provide the essential services to our community which brings the next year’s consolidated budget to $496 million.

 

 

($‘000)

General
Fund

Water
Fund

Sewer
Fund

Consol.

Capital Budget

176,531

27,129

26,554

230,214

Operating Budget

249,739

29,314

42,493

265,724

Total Budget

426,279

56,435

69,046

495,938

 

Council’s financial position has been and will continue to be impacted by COVID-19 measures along with the restrictions introduced to control the spread of the virus. This is evident with our facilities operating under capacity and the requirement to implement additional safety measures across Council businesses. Council has transitioned to new ways to delivering services, whilst at the same time maintaining the health and wellbeing of our staff.

Whilst some of the restrictions have been eased or even lifted, in this uncertain global economic climate, circumstances can change rapidly causing further unexpected business disruption which has the potential to have significant financial consequences on the proposed 2021/22 Budget.

As is evident with all levels of government within Australia and indeed across the world, Council continues to operate in the context of uncertainty, with the proposed 2021/2022 budget being a flexible and dynamic budget to ensure the levels of services provided to the community remain unchanged with opportunities for expansion to be considered as and when the uncertainty decreases.

The financial impact of the situation is continually monitored, along with options to ensure Council continues to be managed in a fiscally responsible manner, and any necessary adjustments to the 2021/22 Budget will be provided for consideration through the quarterly budget review process or sooner should the circumstances warrant.

The budget was prepared based on the principles of prudent financial management and fiscal discipline. It is a balanced budget meaning that the budgeted general fund operational and capital expenditures do not exceed the general revenue and available internal and external restrictions of the Council and conforms to the requirement for generally no cash deficit budgeting. Maintaining a healthy level of working capital was also taken into consideration in the proposed 2021/22 Budget.

While Council continues to prioritise renewal and maintenance of existing assets during the budgeting process, the amount available for these activities remains insufficient due to limited available funds. Council’s assets on average have expired 38.3% of their expected life and a large number of assets are in poor to very poor condition which is below customer expected levels of service.

The introduction of Special Rates in previous years has substantively addressed assets backlog, yet the current estimated backlog cost is $56M to bring Poor and Very Poor assets to a satisfactory condition/standard and to meet the community’s needs identified in the Community Strategic plan (CSP). Council assets also require annual maintenance of $73M and Council currently is funding $64M a funding gap of $9M annually. Each financial year that required maintenance is not being fully funded increases risk and customer satisfaction decreases, as these services being provided from the assets become less fit for purpose, reliable, safe and secure; and each financial year the number of assets in poor to very poor is increasing. The proposed 2.6% increase of rates revenue and SRV catch-up in future years will continue to improve the situation as more funds will be allocated towards assets renewal and maintenance.

It is important for the Councillors to know that while the draft 2021/22 Budget is a balanced budget, it does not result in the replenishment of the unrestricted cash balance for the General Fund which was reduced by $6.5 million as a result of Council providing the $300 of financial relief per rate assessment subsidy.


 

The proposed balanced budget is outlined below ($‘000):

 

2021/22 Budget ($'000)

General Fund

Water Fund

Sewer Fund

Consol.

Rates & Annual Charges

110,301

4,438

46,734

161,473

User Charges and Fees

59,011

21,515

3,965

84,491

Interest and Investment Revenue

3,358

1,026

360

2,900

Other Revenues

3,906

6

0

3,912

Internal Revenue

52,201

1,883

1,543

0

Grants and Contributions provided for Operating Purposes

20,225

0

0

20,225

Grants and Contributions provided for Capital Purposes

54,657

850

3,350

58,857

Total Income

303,659

29,718

55,952

331,858

 

 

 

 

 

Employee Benefits and On-Costs

68,841

5,744

9,769

87,394

Borrowing Costs

1,974

0

3,680

5,459

Materials and Contracts

48,730

5,384

8,448

64,307

Depreciation and Amortisation

45,034

10,754

11,989

67,777

Other Expenses

35,757

2,022

2,686

40,787

Internal Expenses

49,403

5,410

5,921

0

Total Expenses

249,739

29,314

42,493

265,724

 

 

 

 

 

Net Operating Results

53,920

404

13,459

66,134

 

 

 

 

 

Net Surplus/(Deficit) before Capital

(737)

(446)

10,109

7,277

Other Cash Adjustments

 

 

 

 

Capital Expenditure

(176,540)

(27,120)

(26,554)

(230,214)

New Borrowings

32,714

0

0

32,714

Loan Principal Repayments

(10,375)

0

(7,562)

(16,885)

Proceeds from the disposal of assets

5,296

120

100

5,516

Receipt of Internal Loan Repayment

0

1,052

0

0

Depreciation Adjustment

45,034

10,754

11,989

67,777

Dividend Paid to General Fund

0

(170)

(1,479)

0

Net Cash Outflow

(49,951)

(14,960)

(10,047)

(74,958)

Reserve Movements

 

 

 

 

Net Transfers from Reserves

(49,951)

(14,960)

(10,047)

(74,958)

 

 

 

 

 

General Fund Net Cash Movement

0

0

0

0


 

Capital Works Program

An extensive $230 million capital works program has been allocated in the Draft Budget for 2021/22.

Program / Project

Proposed Budget $

Economic Development

35,410,669

Landfill and Transfer Station Operations

31,210,000

Roads

28,451,608

Parks, Reserves, Sport and Recreation Areas

19,659,717

Community, Residential and Commercial Buildings

13,726,129

Tourist Parks

9,115,000

Stormwater

5,935,373

Mechanical Services

5,835,500

Pedestrian Facilities

3,599,500

Traffic Management

3,297,700

Coastal and Estuary Management

2,919,450

Corporate Buildings

2,565,089

Management and Support

2,540,100

Car Parking

2,196,193

Entertainment Centre

2,057,000

Waterways Infrastructure

2,010,140

Tourism and Events

1,721,350

Swim and Fitness

887,700

Information Technology

660,300

Fire Protection and Emergency Services

649,000

Streetscapes

646,863

Library

465,400

Other

972,000

Total General Fund Capital Works Program

176,531,181

Water Services

27,129,153

Sewer Services

26,553,500

Total Capital Program

230,214,434

 


 

The proposed funding sources for the capital works program are:

Funding Source

Proposed
Budget

%

Grants

50,299,810

28%

Loans

32,714,300

19%

Bioelektra Resource Recovery Facility

7,000,000

 

Materials Recovery Facility (will not be required if BLER Grant application is successful)

8,000,000

 

Old Bomaderry Basketball Stadium

1,250,000

 

Caravan Park Development

5,264,300

 

Local Roads Renewal

2,500,000

 

Sanctuary Point - Francis Ryan Reserve - New Amenities

900,000

 

Hyams Beach Reserve – New Amenities

450,000

 

Matching Funding for potential grants ($6 million for Sanctuary Point Library and $1.35 million for Ulladulla Skate Park)*

7,350,000

 

General Fund including Carry Forwards

25,174,964

14%

Existing Loans

23,411,200

13%

Industrial Land

9,614,000

5%

Section 7.11 Deleted

8,423,066

5%

Special Rates

8,103,460

5%

Waste Reserve

6,210,000

4%

Plant Replacement

5,903,900

3%

Section 7.11

2,210,801

1%

Coast Management Infrastructure

1,411,011

1%

Stormwater Levy

1,153,000

1%

Other Internal Reserves

1,902,269

1%

Total General Fund Capital Program

176,531,781

77%

Water Fund

27,129,153

12%

Sewer Fund

26,553,500

12%

Total Capital Works

230,214,434

100%

 

It is important to note that COVID-19 might have significant impact on Council’s ability to deliver and resource some projects and the capital works program remains flexible and will be reassessed by management as the situation evolves. 

 

Budget Details – General Fund

The Operating Result for 2021/22, excluding capital grants, is a deficit of ($737K), compared to the 2020/21 deficit of $3,735K (as per current adopted budget). The main reason for the reduction in deficit in 2021/22 Draft Budget is increase in Waste fees and charges (discussed in the separate report) and increase of rates revenue by 2.6% which includes 0.6% of SRV catch-up ($0.5 million) that will be allocated to fund capital projects.

When capital grants are included, the net operating result is a surplus of $53,920K. There is no net impact on the cash flow result for unrestricted general fund, that is, the budget.

 

Loan Program – General Fund

Council utilises a mix of internal and external reserves along with external borrowings to deliver its capital works program.

This financial year Shoalhaven City Council was successful in securing low-cost loan subsidy for all new eligible loans ($21.5 million). The NSW Government low-cost loan initiative assists councils with the cost of new infrastructure by funding 50% of the interest paid on borrowings related to infrastructure that enables new housing supply, and this subsidy will save Council over $1.6 million in interest over the next 10 years. Next financial year Council will continue to actively manage its Balance Sheet, by taking advantage of the low interest rate environment and up some new borrowings in 2021/22 financial year.

In order to fund the delivery of key strategic projects and maintain a healthy level of working capital, the following new borrowings are proposed in 2021/22 financial year.

The proposed loan program is based on the principles of sound financial management endorsed by the Council:

·    Only borrow to fund activities core to Council’s agreed priorities and never borrow to fund an operating deficit.

·    Borrowings must result into generation of additional revenue and/or savings.

·    Debt Service Cover Ratio (measures the availability of operating cash to cover total debt servicing costs) should be greater than 2x benchmark.

·    Debt Service Ratio (measures total debt servicing costs as a percentage of operating income less capital items and specific purpose grants and contributions) should not exceed the industry benchmark of 15%.

It is important for the Councillors to note that the Additional Provision for Borrowings of $7.350 million might be utilised to fund infrastructure projects only if Council succeeds in acquiring grant funding for Sanctuary Point Library and Ulladulla Skate Park and additional borrowings are required to fund Council contribution to the grant funded projects.

In addition, Council has lodged 18 grant applications under Bushfire Local Economy Recovery (BLER) Fund. The total value of the projects submitted under BLER is $61 million out of which, if successful, Council will need to contribute $15.6 million ($8.6 million from Water Fund, $5.2 million from Waste Fund and $1.8 million General Fund). These capital projects were excluded from the Draft DPOP and some changes to the capital works program for the and funding strategy might need to be revised depending on the outcome of the applications.

It was also noted that Council might have capacity to deliver additional works under the Rural Roads Sealing program and that a funding strategy including potential borrowings for additional works will be considered during quarterly budget reviews.


 

General Fund Projects

2021/22 ($)

Funding Source

Bioelektra Resource Recovery Facility

7,000,000

Waste Fund

Materials Recovery Facility (will not be required if BLER Grant application is successful)

8,000,000

Waste Fund

Bomaderry Basketball Stadium

1,250,000

General Fund

Caravan Park Development

5,264,300

Additional Revenue from Tourist Parks

Local Roads Renewal

2,500,000

General Fund

Sanctuary Point - Francis Ryan Reserve - New Amenities

900,000

General Fund

Hyams Beach Reserve – New Amenities

450,000

General Fund

Total

25,364,300

 

Additional Provision for Borrowings

 

 

Matching Funding for potential grants
($6 million for Sanctuary Point Library & $1.35 million for Ulladulla Skate Park) *

7,350,000

General Fund

Grand Total

32,714,300

 

Total General Fund Loans

12,450,000

 

*Council pursues various grant opportunities and additional borrowings might be required to   fund Councils contribution to the grant funded projects

 

Noting the timing of drawdown on loans and commencement of the projects across the year, an additional $200K for the loans repayments of $23 million loans has been factored into the 2021/22 operational budget as presented at the 2.6% rates increase. It is a common practice for the Council to get loans approved and the start of the financial year and to drawdown on new loans in the last quarter of the financial year.

Based on the current LTFP that may be subject to further change and review, following new loans are forecasted:

 

Year

Loan
Term

New
Loans

Principal Payments

Interest Payments

YE Loan Balance

2022

10 Years

32,714

10,376

1,974

102,223

2023

10 Years

33,859

13,202

2,226

122,880

2024

10 Years

42,758

15,395

2,478

150,243

2025

10 Years

54,033

19,675

2,871

184,601

2026

10 Years

33,146

24,238

3,389

193,509

2027

10 Years

16,271

26,670

3,469

183,109

2028

10 Years

11,337

27,348

3,225

167,097

2029

10 Years

11,697

28,052

2,914

150,742

2030

10 Years

8,600

28,598

2,610

130,744

2031

10 Years

6,387

29,677

2,242

107,455

 


 

Graphs below illustrate projected loan balance and loan interest and repayments over the next 10 years.


Council Debt Service Cover Ratio (measures the availability of operating cash to cover total debt servicing costs) is forecasted to remain above 2x benchmark and Debt Service Ratio (measures total debt servicing costs as a percentage of operating income less capital items and specific purpose grants and contributions) will not exceed the industry benchmark of 15%.

 

 

Ratio

Benchmark

General Fund  Projected 2021/22

Debt Service Cover Ratio

Greater than 2

3.75

Debt Service Ratio

Less than 15%

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Budget Details - Shoalhaven Water

The Operating Result for Water Fund for 2021/22, excluding capital grants, is a deficit of ($446K). This is based on an increase of $1 in the water availability charge and 5c increase in the water usage charge. When capital grants are included, the net operating result is a surplus of $404K.

The Operating Result of Sewer Fund for 2021/22, excluding capital grants, is a surplus of $10,109K. This is based on an increase of 1.8% in the sewer availability charge. When capital grants are included, the net operating result is a surplus of $13,459K.

The Shoalhaven Water Group capital expenditure of $53.6 million has been allocated in the Draft Budget for 2021/22. The total includes the following significant projects/programs:

·    $13.8 million for Moss Vale Road Development

·    $ 7.5 million for Electrical Workshop

·    $12.3 million for upgrade of Mains and Pumping Stations 

 

Community Engagement

A community engagement strategy has been prepared to ensure that the community can be informed about the contents of the Draft Delivery Program and Operational Plan, Budget and Fees & Charges.

The engagement strategy includes a range of communication activities including advertising, media opportunities, digital promotions and information distribution, contact through CCBs, Business Chambers, and through Council’s community engagement portal ‘Get Involved’.

The exhibition will be promoted during existing community engagement sessions occurring throughout the 28 day period. Submissions will be able to be provided to Council online through our community engagement page, via email or in written form.

 


 

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SA21.50     Policy - Petitions to Council

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/39061

 

Department:       Business Assurance & Risk

Approver:           Kevin Voegt, Director - City Performance 

Attachments:     1.  Draft Policy - Petitions to Council

2.  Draft Petitions Template Cover Page

3.  Draft Petitions Template   

Reason for Report

To present for adoption a draft Policy for Petitions to Council, in accordance with MIN20.547.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council

1.    Rescind MIN11.667.

2.    Adopt the attached Draft Policy - Petitions to Council, POL20/48.

3.    Amend the Code of Meeting Practice, POL19/27 at Clause 19.19 to read “ The exact wording of petitions tabled at meetings of the Council shall be recorded in the minutes of that meeting. Petitions will be managed in accordance with the Council’s Policy for Petitions.” 

 

 

Options

1.    As recommended.

Implications: The Policy on Petitions to Council will be adopted and Council will be able to transparently manage the receipt of and response to petitions.

 

2.    Council give alternative direction to staff.

Implications: This will delay the implementation of a policy to manage Council’s management of petitions.

 

Background

A Notice of Motion presented to the 11 August 2020 Strategy & Assets Committee meeting (SA20.135) summarised some of the issues observed in petitions that can compromise their intent. Some petitions have been brought before Council containing errors and ambiguities.

The Notice of Motion submitted stated that:

In recent times, Council has received petitions for and against issues that affect the Shoalhaven Region and there have been community concerns on how petitions are:

a.   interpreted by Council especially when petitions for the same issue are received for and against.

b.   dealt with by Councillors and Council staff.

c.   Actions taken such as 500 signatures generates a report, what happens to less than 500 signatures.

d.   Signatures from overseas and interstate people.

e.   where only locals should sign the petition for local matters.

f.    Electronic (change.org) Petitions and verifying the signatures.

Council resolved (MIN20.547):

That Council request the Chief Executive Officer (or his nominee) to provide a report back to Council on development of a policy/guidelines or framework for Petitions to Council.

The attached draft Policy is provided in response to the above resolution.

Previous Resolution MIN11.667

Council’s current approach to the receipt and management of petitions was last formalised in 2011, when it was resolved (MIN11.667) “That when a petition containing 500 or more signatures is presented to Council that the subject matter of the petition trigger a report from the General Manager to the next Ordinary Meeting of Council” (emphasis added). This resolution is reflected in clause 9.19 of Council’s Code of Meeting Practice.

It is recommended that MIN11.667 be rescinded, in conjunction with adoption of the Policy. This resolution constrains the presentation of a report to a specific timetable, being “the next Ordinary Meeting of Council”. The draft Policy includes the provision for the CEO to determine the most appropriate meeting for reporting to Council, allowing sufficient time to conduct research and consultation where required. This amendment to current practice will improve the quality of reports and is more respectful of the work of the community in arranging petitions. It is proposed that the 500-signature threshold to trigger a report to Council will remain in place.

 

Draft Policy

The attached Petitions to Council Policy provides clarity but addresses petitions in a manner similar to current practice. Petitions meeting the criteria and containing 500 or more valid signatures will trigger a report to Council from the CEO. Petitions will be limited to those which relate to Council business (i.e. Council’s assets, operations and responsibilities), or matters which affect Council or the Shoalhaven community in which the Council has influence.

The policy excludes petitions that relate to objections to environmental planning applications or to a planning decision that has already been made by Council.

It also excludes petitions regarding any matter relating to an individual or entity in respect of which that individual or entity has a right of recourse to a review or appeal under legislation.

A minimum of four (4) signatures must be attached to a petition to be classified as a petition.

Suggested petition templates for use by the community are also provided.

 

Community Engagement

The key message of a proposed Communications Strategy would be that Council wishes to provide fair and equal representation of community concerns by ensuring consistency and transparency in how it receives and manages petitions.

It is not anticipated that the provisions of the draft policy will negatively affect the ability of community members to bring petitions to Council - but will offer procedural clarity that will be of benefit to the community in planning and presenting their petitions.

Once a draft policy for petitions is endorsed by Council, the policy will be published and:

1. Advertised on Council’s website (Get Involved Page)

2. Notified to Community Consultative Bodies

3. Given coverage on Council’s Social Media pages

 

Policy Implications

Council at present has no adopted policy regarding petitions. The introduction of this new policy aligns with the following key priorities of the Community Strategic Plan:

4.2     Provide advocacy and transparent leadership through effective government and administration

4.3     Inform and engage with the community about the decisions that affect their lives

The recommendation outlines amendments to the Code of Meeting Practice to align provisions of that Code with the proposed policy

 

Financial Implications

Nil.

 

Risk Implications

Nil.

 


 

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SA21.51     Council Meeting Dates - Proposed Amendments

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/98510

 

Department:       Business Assurance & Risk

Approver:           Kevin Voegt, Director - City Performance  

Reason for Report

To seek Council approval to vary the resolved dates of

·    The Development & Environment Committee meeting of 4 May 2021, and the Strategy & Assets Committee meeting of 11 May 2021, to allow for Councillor attendance at the OzWater and Waste 2021 Conferences: and

·    The 22 June 2021 Ordinary meeting which falls during the Australian Local Government Association National General Assembly.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council reschedule the following meetings:

1.    Development & Environment Committee: from Tuesday 4 May 2021 to Tuesday 11 May 2021 commencing at 5.00pm

2.    Strategy & Assets Committee: from Tuesday 11 May 2021 to Tuesday 18 May 2021 commencing at 5.00pm

3.    Ordinary Meeting of Council: from Tuesday 22 June 2021 to Tuesday 29 June 2021 commencing at 5.00pm.

 

 

Options

1.    As recommended.

 

2.    Retain any or all of the currently scheduled meeting dates as originally resolved.

Implications: The conduct of the meetings may be affected by absences due to attendance at the Ozwater Conference, Waste 2021 Conference, or National General Assembly.

 

3.    Council reschedules the meetings to different dates.

 

Background

May 2021 Development & Environment Committee and Strategy & Assets Committee meetings

Several Councillors will be attending either the Australian Water Association Ozwater’21 or the Waste 2021 Conference, scheduled for 4-6 May 2021 in Adelaide and Coffs Harbour respectively.

It is recommended that the 4 May Development & Environment Committee meeting be deferred by one week to allow Councillors to attend the conference. The following Strategy & Assets Committee meeting would consequently be rescheduled to the week after (18 May 2021).

June Ordinary Meeting of Council

The Australian Local Government Association National General Assembly has been scheduled for 20 to 23 June 2021. The Assembly is being held as a ‘hybrid’ event which allows the option of remote or physical attendance.

Consequently, it is necessary to reschedule the June Council Ordinary Meeting to allow Councillors to attend the conference.

 

Community Engagement

The community will be advised of the changes via notifications on Council’s website and social media platforms.

 


 

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SA21.52     Re-establishment of Alcohol Free Zones - Nowra East, Shoalhaven Heads, Culburra Beach/Orient Point, Mollymook

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/118179

 

Department:       Business Assurance & Risk

Approver:           Kevin Voegt, Director - City Performance 

Attachments:     1.  Nowra East Location Map

2.  Shoalhaven Heads Location Map

3.  Culburra Beach Location 1 Map

4.  Culburra Beach Location 2 Map

5.  Orient Point/Crookhaven Location Map

6.  Mollymook Location Map   

Reason for Report

To consider a proposal to re-establish those Alcohol Free Zones in areas of the Shoalhaven which are due to expire in 2021.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That:

1.    Council proceed with the re-establishment process of the Alcohol Free Zones for a period of four (4) years in the areas of Nowra East, Shoalhaven Heads, Culburra Beach, Orient Point/Crookhaven and Mollymook including consultation with licensees in the surrounding areas;

2.    Should no objections be received to the re-establishment of these zones, authority be given to staff to proceed with the declaration of the proposed areas as an Alcohol Free Zone, without further reference to Council.

 

 

Options

1.    As recommended – proceed with the re-establishment of the Alcohol Free Zones until 2025. As outlined in the report, these areas have been agreed to by the NSW Police as appropriate for the purpose of limiting alcohol consumption and maintaining community safety.

 

2.    That Council does not proceed with the re-establishment of the Alcohol Free Zone in the areas specified in the report.

Implications: This may result in the increase of anti-social behaviour and property damage resulting from irresponsible street drinking.

 

 

Background

Council has established the Alcohol Free Zones (which are due to expire in the near future) in accordance with Section 644 of the Local Government Act 1993, which prohibits consumption of alcohol on Council-owned footpaths, roads and carparks within the zones specified in this report. 

It is proposed that Council re-establish the following existing areas as declared Alcohol Free Zones:

·    Nowra East (Refer Map Attachment 1)

·    Shoalhaven Heads (Refer Map Attachment 2)

·    Culburra Beach (Refer Map Attachments 3 & 4)

·    Orient Point/Crookhaven (Refer Map Attachment 5)

·    Mollymook (Refer Map Attachment 6)

Council sought support from the NSW Police Service - Shoalhaven Local Area Command, NSW Aboriginal Legal Service, NSW Anti-Discrimination Board, Council’s Community Capacity Building Team, Business and Property Sections and Council’s Ranger Services for the zones to be re-established for the allowed four (4) year period, for the purpose of preventing alcohol related crime in the area. No adverse comments have been received.

Notification has also been forwarded to a number of premises in the surrounding locations holding liquor licences.

 

Community Engagement

Alcohol Free Zones are created in streets and car parks with the aim to reduce anti-social behaviour and property damage resulting from irresponsible street drinking. Advice from Police is that re-establishing these zones certainly assists them in performing their role.

In accordance with the Guidelines, should Council proceed with the re-establishment, community consultation will be conducted.

 

Financial Implications

The direct costs associated with the re-establishment of the Alcohol Free Zones detailed in this report include advertising, general administration costs and the erection or placement of a sticker on signs, which can be funded within the current Budget.

 


 

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SA21.53     2020/2021 Council Borrowings - Loan Agreement - Holiday Haven

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/128852

 

Department:       Finance

Approver:           Kevin Voegt, Director - City Performance 

Attachments:     1.  CBA Bank Loan Agreement (including letter of offer, authorised officer's certificate and drawdown notice). (under separate cover)   

Reason for Report

To seek Council approval to enter into a loan agreement with Commonwealth Bank of Australia for Holiday Haven’s borrowing requirements.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.    Enter into a loan agreement with Commonwealth Bank of Australia for the amount of $3,590,000 with a term of 10 years @ 1.94% to cover Holiday Haven’s borrowing requirements that were included in the 2020/21 Operational Plan.

2.    Execute the following documents:

a.    Letter of offer.

b.    Authorised officer’s certificate.

c.    Drawdown notice.

 

 

Options

1.    Adopt the recommendations in the report.

Implications: NIL.

 

2.    Not adopt the recommendations and make an alternative resolution.

Implications: Commonwealth Bank of Australia will require reimbursement of costs to unwind fixed rate market transactions. On acceptance of the quote, Council acknowledged it may incur costs to receive a fixed rate until drawdown.  Council will need to seek borrowings from other financial institutions.

 

Background

Total borrowings for General Fund and Waste Fund of $49,028,778 have been included in Council’s Operational Plan subsequently amended by MIN20.535.

Council is currently seeking quotes from TCorp and other financial insttutions to obtain loans for non-commercial developments of $45,438,778. The remainder of the 2020/21 proposed borrowings for Holiday Haven, $3,590,000, need to be sourced from other financial institutions because TCorp’s loan facilities are not available for a Council-run business in competition with existing privately-run businesses. Council requested quotes from four financial institutions. The lowest quote received was from CBA with 1.94% fixed rate principal deductions for 10 years.

 

Financial Implications

It is important for Council to gain the best interest rates on loan funding and locking this agreement in place will confirm a fixed term rate for the full 10 years of the loan agreement. This offer of loan funds from Commonwealth Bank of Australia requires formal acceptance by Council no later than 28 April 2021.

 

 

  


 

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SA21.54     Report Back - Representations - Shoalhaven Hospital Car Parking

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/84426

 

Department:       Strategic Planning

Approver:           Robert Domm, Director - City Futures 

Attachments:     1.  Sept 2020 Notice of Motion - Shoalhaven Hospital Staff Parking

2.  Responses - Nov/Dec 2020 - Shoalhaven Hospital Staff Parking Representations   

Reason for Report

Report back on the outcome of the 22 September 2020 resolution that:

Council staff make representations to the State Government to ensure that nurses and hospital staff at Shoalhaven District Hospital are provided with ‘free parking stickers’, which cover on-street parking as well as on-site carpark parking.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council receive the report on the outcome of representations regarding car parking associated with the Shoalhaven Hospital for information.

 

 

Options

1.    Receive the report for information.

Implications: This will essentially mean that nothing further is done at this point. However, it is likely that community representations will continue regarding parking issues associated with the hospital

 

2.    Pursue one of the options discussed later in the report.

Implications: This will depend on whether any of the options discussed later are pursued, noting that to date Council’s representations have been unsuccessful and may continue to be.

 

Background

Following consideration of a further Notice of Motion on this issue (Attachment 1), Council resolved on 22 September 2020 (MIN20.638):

That Council staff make representations to the State Government to ensure that nurses and hospital staff at Shoalhaven District Hospital are provided with ‘free parking stickers’, which cover on-street parking as well as on-site carpark parking.

The CEO Note on the September 2020 Notice of Motion also contains an overview of previous Council representations in this regard and also comment on the option of parking stickers.

Letters were subsequently sent to both the NSW Minister for Health, Brad Hazzard MP and the Chief Executive Officer of the Illawarra-Shoalhaven Local Health District (ISLHD). Copies were sent to both local MPs.

The letters requested that the NSW Government provide free parking for nurses and hospital staff in accordance with the resolution and advised that Council was willing to work with the NSW Government to help provide the requested free parking.

Responses to both letters were received in late 2020 (Attachment 2) and these were circulated to Councillors at the time. The responses essentially note:

·        From the start of the car park project it was identified that parking fees would be incurred for staff, patients and visitors at a regional rate.

·        As part of the Covid-19 response, car parking has been free for healthcare workers at NSW hospitals.

·        400 on-site parking spaces are available for staff, volunteers and fleet vehicles.

·        ISLHD has no jurisdiction over street parking.

From media reports in early March 2021, the free Covid-19 car parking response has ended and NSW Health has resumed charging hospital staff to park at their workplaces.

Given the representations that have been made in this regard and the responses received, Council needs to determine where to take further action in this regard. The broad options include:

Do Nothing – This would mean Council does nothing further in this regard. However, community representations will most likely continue regarding parking issues associated with the hospital. These may increase as work on the overall hospital masterplan advances and construction commences.

Continue to Advocate for Free Parking – Council’s previous representations have been unsuccessful. Since late 2019 a number of approaches have been made to the NSW Government advocating for permanent free car parking for at least hospital staff and most recently for free parking stickers. Council could continue to advocate for permanent free parking but it remains that the NSW Government’s position may not change.

Alternatively, Council could advocate for free parking for staff for a set timeframe (e.g. 2 years). This would at least acknowledge that major construction work is happening in the area and this will impact on local road infrastructure for the foreseeable future. This includes the bridge works and the hospital development. There are other works such as the Nowra Showground upgrade that will also impact.

As part of this the NSW Government could potentially negotiate with its contractor so they are recompensed. It is however considered highly likely that this option will also not be supported by the NSW Government.

Cooperative Solutions – These could be further considered but may not exist or be practical/desirable. These could include:

·   Parking stickers/permits – this was suggested in the September 2020 resolution. Council could continue to push for the NSW Government to issue free parking stickers or parking permits/passes to hospital staff for the parking spaces within the hospital campus. This is unlikely to be successful given the most recent NSW Government response.

The suggestion of free parking permits/passes for on street parking would have little or no impact as noted in the commentary on the September 2020 Notice of Motion (see Attachment 1) and should not be pursued further.

·   Additional at grade parking close to the hospital – this has been suggested previously and could involve the provision, possibly by Council, of additional free at grade parking in appropriate road reserves or other areas of public land (e.g. Showground precinct) close to the hospital.

This option is not ideal and would be problematic to achieve and difficult to justify (further loss of public land, cost shifting, community opposition, impacts on neighbours etc), particularly given a government funded multi-level car park exists.

·   Other options – other potential options have been suggested, such as a shuttle bus paid for by NSW Government to existing public car parks (e.g. Gas Works Car Park) or under used public areas that are further away (e.g. West Street Oval).

Again, this is undesirable as existing public car parks have been funded and designed to meet existing needs and not those of existing public development (in this case the hospital) that has the opportunity to manage its own car parking needs on site.

 

Conclusion

Given that previous representations in this regard have been unsuccessful and have not resulted in any change to the carparking arrangements associated with the hospital, Council needs to decide whether it continues to advocate in this regard and if so, for what.

 

Community Engagement

No direct community engagement has been carried out by Council in regard to this issue.

 

Financial Implications

This will depend on what is decided by Council regarding further actions.

 

 


 

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SA21.55     Nowra-Bomaderry Bypass - Chronology

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/119809

 

Department:       Strategic Planning

Approver:           Robert Domm, Director - City Futures 

Attachments:     1.  Chronology of Relevant Council Resolutions

2.  Map - Corridor Reserved for Nowra-Bomaderry Bypass   

Reason for Report

Present the requested chronology of Council decisions/actions regarding the regional services corridor/proposed Nowra-Bomaderry Bypass.

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That the report on the Nowra-Bomaderry Bypass – Chronology be received for information.

 

 

Options

The report is presented for information - Council can determine what subsequent action it may wish to take, noting that there are other recent resolutions in this regard that are also separately being progressed.

 

Background

Council resolved on 23 February 2021 (MIN21.85):

That Council staff prepare a chronology for the April Strategy & Assets Committee Meeting regarding the resolutions and reports specific to proposed routes for the Nowra Bypass options, over the past ten years or so. The chronology would essentially include some vital commentary and recommendations as to the point of view of Council’s, or the State Government’s, professional staff.

This report responds to this resolution and sets out the key events and decisions regarding the corridor currently reserved and protected in the Shoalhaven Local Environmental Plan (LEP) 2014). Attachment 1 provides a list of relevant Council decisions/considerations and Attachment 2 indicates the currently corridor that is identified in the LEP.

The recognition and protection of the corridor is achieved via an additional local provision in the LEP - Clause 7.21 Development on land in the vicinity of the Western Bypass Corridor. This clause limits/controls development that could compromise, restrict or otherwise prevent the future use of the corridor as a road. The corridor identified in the LEP is generally 200 metres wide – this provides flexibility for future siting of the bypass road and possibly other regional services as required (e.g. Eastern Gas Pipeline - already partially within the corridor around Nowra-Bomaderry).

Sections of the corridor have also been secured through time by Council’s acquisition of strategic parts of the corridor (e.g. areas to south of Illaroo Road, Bangalee and also at Albatross Road, Nowra Hill). Other government decisions have also recognised the current corridor, such as the determination and resolution of Aboriginal Land Claims at various points along the route.

Council’s ongoing advocacy for the planning and delivery of the bypass is thus based on the current corridor that is contained in the LEP. These include, for example, submissions to the NSW Government’s recently exhibited draft regional land use and transport plans and focussed representations to Governments calling for the immediate planning and accelerated delivery of the bypass.

The following map from material associated with the Nowra Bridge Project shows the current LEP corridor overlain on an aerial photograph of the Nowra-Bomaderry area.

 

Key Points - Current Corridor Selection & Advocacy Activity

Attachment 1 provides a list of relevant Council decisions/considerations. However, key events/decisions in the selection of the current corridor and a record of Council’s advocacy activity for its delivery are summarised below:

·   1986: a ‘regional services corridor’ around Nowra-Bomaderry to the west was identified in the NSW Government’s Illawarra Regional Environmental Plan (REP) No.1. This plan was a formal environmental planning instrument and it recognised/protected the corridor and set planning outcomes for subsequent local environmental plans to do the same.

The provisions of the REP provided limitations on future development to protect the corridor and also encouraged the location, where appropriate, of relevant utility infrastructure in the corridor (Note: Eastern Gas Pipeline was subsequently located partially in the corridor).

The following map is an extract from the REP written instrument (Note: there were also more detailed maps that were produced).

Extract: Illawarra REP 1986 (NSW Government)

·   1990: Amendment No.14 (Nowra Hill) to Shoalhaven LEP1985 was prepared by Council and gazetted by the NSW Government. This amendment identified in detail the corridor south of the Shoalhaven River. As a result it also refined the potential bridge crossing point. Clause 40A Development in the vicinity of the regional services corridor was added to the LEP as part of this amendment.

·   1992: Following the Nowra Hill LEP amendment Council adopted its preferred option for the alignment of the corridor north of river, amending the previous route to reduce impacts on private property.

Council also resolved to undertake initial analysis for the amended route (engineering and flora and fauna) before including the corridor in the City-wide Local Environmental Plan (Shoalhaven LEP 1985).

·   2000: Council released the Nowra Bomaderry Concept Plan as initial work in relation to a new Structure Plan for the Nowra-Bomaderry area. This plan discussed the Highway bypass options for the area (three) and the range of considerations, including the western one.

The ’concept’ that was part of this plan showed the ‘western bypass’ alignment consistent with the decisions made by Council in 1990 and 1992. It is noted a feature of this concept was the placement of the proposed university campus and ‘investigation areas’ for residential and industrial adjacent to the western alignment to assist with future access.

·   2006: Council confirmed its preferred corridor alignment (as settled in 1992) with further minor amendments to reduce impacts on private property, with the preparation and adoption of the Nowra-Bomaderry Structure Plan. This plan identified the western corridor as part of the indicative future road network – see extract below.

Nowra-Bomaderry Structure Plan Extract

·   2008: The NSW Government (Department of Planning) endorsed the Nowra-Bomaderry Structure Plan and as a result the preferred western corridor alignment.

Note: No further substantive changes have been made to the preferred corridor alignment since this time.

·   2011-12: The preparatory work and 2011 exhibition documents for the new City-wide Local Environmental Plan (then proposed to be named Shoalhaven Local Environmental Plan 2009) included the preferred corridor and proposed to protect and secure it through land use zones and land acquisition requirements. The 2011 draft LEP proposed that the corridor alignment would be zoned SP2 Infrastructure.

The October 2011 submission provided by the then NSW Roads & Traffic Authority (RTA) on the draft plan noted that ‘the RTA supports the retention of the western bypass reservation. While the RTA has not undertaken a detailed review of the TRACKS modelling undertaken to date to support the Nowra Bomaderry Structure Plan (NBSP) or undertaken its own investigations at this stage, it is considered important to retain the bypass reservation. It is considered likely that significant upgrades will be required to the Princes Highway to accommodate future growth in the Shoalhaven and the retention of the bypass alignment could provide an alternative in the event that the Princes Highway alone cannot accommodate future traffic flows’.

·   2013-14: Work on the finalisation of the City-wide Local Environmental Plan (then named Shoalhaven Local Environmental Plan 2013) continued and still included the preferred corridor alignment. Including a second exhibition in 2013.

However, the measures to recognise and secure it were downgraded to the current protective controls (no zoning or land acquisition requirements) given that the NSW Government would not agree to be the acquisition authority for the corridor at that point as it was not yet on their forward plans.

Retaining an SP2 zoning would have required an acquisition authority to be nominated. If an authority is specifically not nominated then the default acquisition authority would be Council. Given this an alternative approach was taken and the preferred corridor alignment was mapped in the LEP (see Attachment 2) and the following clause supports the map layer:

Clause 7.21 Development on land in the vicinity of the Western Bypass Corridor

(1)     The objectives of this clause are as follows –

(a)     to minimise any visual or acoustic impacts on development proposed in the vicinity of the land to which this clause applies,

(b)      to ensure that development proposed in the vicinity of that land will not compromise, restrict or otherwise prevent the future use of that land as a road.

(2)          This clause applies to land identified as “Cl 7.21” on the Clauses Map.

 

(2)     Despite any other provision of this Plan, development consent must not be granted for development on land in the vicinity of the land to which this clause applies unless the consent authority has assessed the following –

(a)     the impact of noise, vibrations and other emissions from any future construction and the ongoing use of that land as a road,

(b)     if the proposed development is a subdivision of land—whether or not the development would prejudice or otherwise restrict the future construction (including the provision of any public utility infrastructure) and operation of the proposed road.

·   2014: Shoalhaven LEP 2014 gazetted by the NSW Government.

·   2017: Council confirmed the corridor in its advocacy document Nowra Key Road Projects presented to State and Federal Members and calling for ongoing planning, funding and delivery commitments related to important road projects.

·   2018: Council’s submission to the NSW Government on the new Princes Highway bridge crossing the Shoalhaven River advocated, amongst other things, for the continued planning of the bypass.

·   2020: The NSW Government publicly exhibits its draft long-term (20+ years) land use and transport planning documents for the Illawarra-Shoalhaven Region. Neither document identifies the preferred corridor; nor do they include any funding, planning, or delivery commitments for the bypass.

·   2021: Council’s submission on the NSW Government’s draft Regional Plan (land use) and Regional Transport Plan for the Illawarra-Shoalhaven Region requests that the confirmed preferred corridor alignment be recognised and identified in these plans and advocates for funding commitments and immediate planning work to deliver the bypass. Council has also made focussed representations to State Members calling for the same.

It is noted that various other NSW Government technical reports, for example related to the current Nowra Bridge project, refer to the western bypass, for example the report: Additional Shoalhaven River Crossing, Numbaa Island to Bangalee (SMEC Pty Ltd for NSW RTA, July 2004).

Conclusion

The current preferred corridor alignment for the proposed Nowra-Bomaderry Bypass was settled in 2008 by both Council and the NSW Government, following several amendments of the corridor first identified by the NSW Government in 1986. This corridor has since been confirmed on numerous occasions through the endorsement of land use planning strategies and publication of local environmental plans.

It is however disappointing that the NSW Government has not directly recognised or acknowledged the corridor alignment in its broader or longer-term plans for the Region and local area. This is perhaps because at this point it is not on their shorter-term planning and funding horizon. At present Council is the only body that is currently actively working through its planning scheme and related actions to protect and advance the corridor alignment so it is available in the future when needed.

Council’s advocacy activity for the funding, planning and delivery of the bypass has been ongoing in earnest since 2012, with significant requests for action occurring during broader transport planning work (in 2017), planning for the new bridge (in 2018), and, most recently, the NSW Government’s work preparing long-term land use and transport plans.

Based on the survey data and traffic modelling analysis and discussions with Transport for NSW staff generally there is agreement with the need to address the existing Princes Highway corridor through Nowra-Bomaderry first and in the shorter term, followed by a longer-term bypass of Nowra-Bomaderry; however, what is not agreed are the specific timeframes.

 


 

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SA21.56     Shoalhaven, the Economic Future

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/114006

 

Department:       Economic Development

Approver:           Robert Domm, Director - City Futures  

Reason for Report

This report was requested as a Notice of Motion passed at the 23 February 2021 Council meeting.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.    Accept the report of the Shoalhaven, the Economic Future.

2.    Establish a comprehensive position, with examples, of the impact of the Biodiversity Conservation Act on the pricing and development of employment lands in Shoalhaven and report this to a future Strategy and Assets Committee including:

a.    Prepare a strategy to lobby the NSW Government to address the implications of the Biodiversity Conservation Act on employment lands.

b.    Case studies of where the impacts were detrimental to the creation of employment within Shoalhaven.

3.    Continue to foster and grow its industry base and concentrate on extending this diverse industry mix across the City so that a greater level of economic resilience can be delivered in periods of economic adversity.

 

 

Options

1.    Accept the resolution as printed.

Implications: More opportunities to further advocate the Shoalhaven position

 

2.    Propose an alternate resolution.

Implications: Change a winning formula or modify it.

 

Background

This report is in response to the following resolution (MIN21.84) passed by Council at its 23 February 2021 meeting:

That the Economic Development Department of Shoalhaven City Council prepare a report for the April Strategy & Assets Committee Meeting detailing the following:

1.    How the “thinking” regarding economic development has evolved as a result of the recent infrastructure windfall.

2.    The adequacy of our zonings to accommodate the expected future business and investment opportunities.

3.    The potential for our city to establish itself, increasingly, as a “hub” in the hi-tech or even the traditional manufacturing type industries.

Over the last decade the subjects of “Economic Development” and “Regional Development” have emerged in importance at a political level owing to the “noise” being created from within the regions that they felt neglected, had greater influence and a potential to be part of a solution rather than a problem.

At the political level, the more populous regional Australia together with the outer metropolitan electorates became the areas that could shore up a government or provide the opportunity to move an opposition into government. Issues such as a hospital, an upgrade to a state or federal highway, improved facilities at a railway station, an upgrade or even a new school provided the fodder to sway electorates. There were always grants to Councils or community groups that were also in the mix, despite there being no “pork barrelling” but rather an identified community need.

Shoalhaven Council has played its part in this process. Lobbying for improvements to infrastructure has been something that this Council has done well. The fact that our economy has been steadily growing in Shoalhaven from $3.74b in 2013 to $6.15b in 2020 has demonstrated a 9.9% average annual growth in Gross Regional Product for the LGA. The following table shows the component industry sectors and the % that they contribute to this GRP.

Chart

The infrastructure windfall

The focus by governments, and oppositions, on the outer metropolitan and regional cities, has been to the benefit of the regional ring around Sydney. Council has been active over many years to drive its agenda and concentrate its lobbying on those assets that would return a social and economic benefit to this region.

Projects such as the upgrades to HMAS Albatross ($603m), the PH upgrade – Gerringong to Bomaderry ($1,062m), the building and subsequent upgrade to the South Coast Correctional Centre ($260m), have been great shots into the arm of the Shoalhaven economy. Today we see further major projects either underway:

·    Shoalhaven River Crossing ($342m),

·    Upgrading South Coast Rail – Berry to Bomaderry ($44m)

or being planned for commencement in the near future:

·    Shoalhaven Hospital ($432m)

·    South Coast Rail – Toolijooa passing loop ($125m)

·    Jervis Bay Rd intersection (c$50m)

These capital projects represent major growth on the area and provide employment directly and indirectly as can be seen in the following graph:

As shown in the graph the average input of around $60m per quarter over the period 2017-2027 has been generating 250 FTE jobs consistently over this period.

This significant hard infrastructure has been able to demonstrate to many groups that Shoalhaven is on the up and that the success of securing this body of work represents co-operation between the 3 levels of government. From this a focus by other agencies to recognise Shoalhaven as a growth region, and one that demands to be considered, has been seen in reports and strategies from a local, regional and state perspective. Private analysts, like Bernard Salt and others, have been identifying Shoalhaven as one of the emerging growth centres.

The engine drivers of the growth of the Shoalhaven economy have been quick to respond to the impacts of COVID and experienced growth and employment shortages from mid-2020 and exist still today. This confidence in investment in production capacity comes about because of the infrastructure boom that they can see happening in this region. So, has this delivered, and being constructed, infrastructure had an effect? It adds to the confidence of local entrepreneurs as well as instils confidence of the boardrooms of the bigger entities that make investment decisions which affect Shoalhaven.

This Council has endeavoured to be ahead of the strategic game required through the identification of the assets needed to accommodate growth and investment. If a business wishes to establish in Shoalhaven and employ 200+, it can be done. The major national brands have spent much locally to address the growing market: Woolworths, Bunnings, Harvey Norman, Aldi… they have not been courted, they look at the statistics and the government spend - and their dollars follow accordingly.

The new growth centre model, Special Activation Precincts, have been announced across the State, but in Shoalhaven these same strategists for government have not found where Nowra or Shoalhaven fits in their model. They have identified the aviation and defence support industry, now 25 years young in Shoalhaven; the recycling/reuse economy, a sector that Council has been involved in but has not yet secured an icon entity; and the Shoalhaven River waterfront at Nowra.

The time is right for one or two of these to take off, or might it be aquatic biotechnology and nutraceuticals that could be the next big industry sector in Shoalhaven, or could it be marine tourism?

Supporting winners

25 years ago, when unemployment was around 15-17%, and even 15 years ago when again unemployment was 10-12%, it was easier to seek funding based on social disadvantage and slower growth indicators.

In the last decade, the mantra has changed somewhat to reflect the successful results of the lobbying and hard work to that of “follow our indicators and be part of this growth”. The projects currently on the horizon total around $2.7b and reflect improvement in roads, rail, maritime, shopping precincts, medical and general employment lands. Through these initiatives around 4000 new direct jobs will be created by 2031. These capital projects will be funded by different mixes of Federal, State and Local governments.

The focus in the more recent pipeline of grants and subsidies is the deliberate criteria to grow regional economic development, and through this that new jobs will be created.

Shoalhaven has been able to demonstrate that the focus of the Council has always been on stimulating the economy proactively, and this strategy has been easy to sell to grant providers now that there is a definite bias by governments to support regional areas.

In more recent times, recovery and resilience have become the focus, but Council has been able to adapt and has become innovative in this space.

Forward planning is not all Plain-Sailing

Council has generally been ahead of the demand for employment lands, both commercial and industrial. The 80 hectare rezoning of rural residential land at South Nowra to industrial IN1 is probably the most significant example of this. The rezoning itself only goes part of the way in creating a resource for the future. The provision of adequate industrial infrastructure – roads, drainage, water, sewer, communications and electricity – are all necessary prerequisites and in the case of South Nowra could be in the order of $100m.

In this instance, and there are others, Council needs to step in as the infrastructure co-ordinator to bring these projects forward, and this role needs to be proactive and ongoing.

Changes to State and Federal legislation can also both be a double-edged sword. The introduction of the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 has a noble intent to secure our natural environment. However, this legislation could well seriously impede Shoalhaven’s strategic forward planning to identify and set aside areas as zoned employment precincts into the future. The BCAct has arguably rendered many of these future employment lands as unviable due to the fact that they are relatively forested lands and the Biodiversity offsets to be paid can inflate the cost of development to be around 500% of the market price, rendering the project undeliverable.

One such incidence is on Council’s own Flinders Industrial Estate. An area of approximately 6ha zoned IN1 requires an assessment under the BCAct. The initial appraisal by a qualified assessor was that the offsets could be in the order of $6.2m or $100/m². This amount can be reduced by undertaking specific studies to assess the quality of the habitat and the evidence of species occurring in the area. These studies are required to be undertaken during certain times of the year and may even require several years of study. So, for a parcel of land that has an assessed market value of $100/m², that has a further development cost of in excess of $500,000, could require around $200,000 in environmental studies, and may take 3-5 years to resolve, then the question needs to be asked should Council proceed with this development at all?

Similar parcels of IN1/IN2 land exist with other virgin bushland at South Nowra and across the City that are owned in the main by the NSW Government or various Local Aboriginal Land Councils. To eliminate or effectively withdraw these lands from future development could mean that with all the good intentions in the world, Shoalhaven may not have the capacity to create the right types of hi-tech employment and be unable to capitalise fully on the infrastructure windfall which now besets us.

This opens up a new challenge for Council to move on. Some years ago, this Council heavily lobbied for the Native Conservation Act to not apply to industrially zoned land. Council was successful in having industrially zoned land declared as “urban”, the same as residential and commercially zoned land, and thus became exempt from the provisions of the NC Act.

In this instance the BCAct is far more restrictive as it imposes an offset charge against the developer and around 80% of industrially zoned in Shoalhaven would be affected, with the greatest impost being upon the Crown and LALCs’ holdings, rendering their employment lands unviable.

Manufacturing is not dead

Manufacturing in Shoalhaven has been strong for decades and represents one of the stronger industrial sectors generating many direct jobs, but also it is the strongest sector for generating downstream or indirect jobs.

The trend to more advanced methods of manufacturing has been adopted by local industry to achieve greater productivity. Automation does not necessarily reduce labour but allows greater output per unit of labour, something that has raised the $ output per worker from $130,027 in 2013 to $172,325 in 2020 or an average rise of 5% per annum. From the table below, the sectors that can be attributed to local businesses are Manufacturing, Construction and Wholesale Trade which strongly services those sectors as well.

Chart

It is true that this advanced manufacturing sector, the supporting industries and technologies, as well as the construction sector lifted Shoalhaven out of COVID and will be the mainstay of the economic value adding locally. The government and administrative sector is also very important, especially when the payroll is coming from the national or state expenditure streams.

Summary

The future for the Shoalhaven to remain a diverse and vibrant economy is for the opportunities to exist for the industry sectors with the higher local employment multipliers to grow in the local area. Manufacturing and Construction are the two strongest sectors in this regard.

Council as well as local business have been to the fore with regard to utilising grants and subsidies to drive this growth. Continuation of this strategy is supported by Council’s Economic Development Office.

The availability of employment lands is critical to achieve growth, and whilst the zones are in place, the cost of development is currently inhibiting this because of the implications of the Biodiversity Conservation legislation.

Advanced technology is the way forward, and local industry are willing to embrace and invest in this, and have even established an Advanced Manufacturing Centre operated by Air Affairs P/L where modern trade skills are transferred to the up-and-coming technicians across a range of skill areas. It is these home-grown technicians of the future that will be the mainstay of the local growth as they explore national and export markets to sell their skills and technologies.

Shoalhaven has always been at the forefront with business innovation, something recognised by the higher levels of government and rewarded by successful applications for grants for Council and local business. This work will continue with projects such as:

·    Flinders Industrial Estate stage 10

·    Albatross Aviation Park stage 5

·    Woollamia Industrial Estate stages 5 & 5A

·    Ulladulla Harbour berthing facility

·    Woollamia Maritime Precinct

·    Ulladulla Boardwalk stages 3, 4 & 5

·    Improvements to transport networks

PH: Jervis Bay Rd – Sussex Inlet Rd

PH: Milton Ulladulla bypass

PH: Lake Burrill to Batemans Bay

Upgrade of link from Nerriga to Tarago for HML vehicles

Sth Coast Rail: Extending the home yard at Bomaderry station

Sth Coast Rail: Toolijooa Passing loop

Sth Coast Rail: new mid-point turnout for Dunmore siding

Sth Coast Rail: Train turnaround siding between Unanderra and Coniston Junction

Addressing issues relating to Nowra traffic congestion

·    Economic Development business as usual

Attracting new business to area

Working with local business to expand and develop

Co-ordinating training sessions for business

……..

Local businesses will tap into these improved infrastructure assets and invest in their premises, their plant and most importantly, their people.

Community Engagement

Local business groups, in conjunction with the Economic Development Office, are supportive of the local economic growth and performance. The key industries that do deliver in this regard are not seeking local notoriety but rather ensure that their employees, their local suppliers are appreciative of and value their efforts.

 

Policy Implications

There are some policies at all levels of government that impinge on the productivity of business and the allowance of growth. It is incumbent on Council, through its Economic Development Office and others, to draw to the attention of governments where issues to allow business and employment to flourish are restrictive.

One such need is to address the negative impact that the Biodiversity Conservation Act is having on the ability to supply local employment opportunities.

 

Financial Implications

Council’s support for local industry needs to embrace the supply of goods and services. There is also an implication here for local businesses to offer “value for money” to Council. In the Civil contracting and building space the majority of Council works are won locally.

 

Risk Implications

By Council not remaining proactive in the Regional Economic Development space and just awaiting the next handout or grant, other regions, towns and localities will offer a better product in the diverse marketplace. Trying to maintain a diversified economy is the key. In recent times the vulnerability of certain smaller villages that had concentrated on tourism was and is clearly evident and there is a need to have these villages attempt to diversify their own economies away from the singular tourism product.

  


 

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SA21.57     Land Acquisition Matters - Cambewarra Locality

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/75969

 

Department:       Technical Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services   

Reason for Report

This report is to provide Council with an opportunity to consider a confidential report for the acquisition of land in the Cambewarra locality.

Further information is provided in a separate confidential report in accordance with Section 10(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993; if the information was disclosed, this would confer a commercial advantage on a person with whom Council is conducting (or proposes to conduct) business with.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council, in accordance with Section 10(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993, consider a separate confidential report in relation to property acquisition matters associated with Cambewarra locality.

 

 

Options

1.    Adopt the recommendation

Implications: Consider a separate confidential report for the proposed acquisition of land in the Cambewarra locality.

 

2.    Not adopt the recommendation

 

 


 

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SA21.58     Proposed Licence - Council as Lessee from Wardens of the Anglican Parish of Ulladulla

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/77497

 

Department:       Technical Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services  

Reason for Report

This report provides Council with an opportunity to consider a license arrangement with the Wardens of the Anglican Parish of Ulladulla, over the carpark area on the Church grounds being Lot 11 DP 1225771 as depicted in the below diagram.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.      Enter into a Licence agreement with Wardens of the Anglican Parish of Ulladulla for the carpark area of the Church grounds from 16 March 2021 to 14 February 2026 for an annual rent amount of $3,000 + GST per annum;

2.      Authorise the rent to be paid from Finance Project 101771 Southern Local Roads;

3.      Authorise the Common Seal of the Council of the City of Shoalhaven to be affixed to any document required to be sealed and delegate to the Chief Executive Officer authority to sign any documentation necessary to give effect to this resolution.

 

 

Options

1.    Resolve as Recommended

Implications: This will provide highly utilised public carparking for the township of Milton until such time as the Milton Carparking Strategy is finalised.

 

2.    Not adopt Recommendation

Implications: Lack of public carparking in Milton may result in Council having to finalise the Milton Carparking Strategy and require additional costs in carparking construction for a new carpark.

 

Background

Council as Lessee initially entered into a license agreement in 2005 with the Wardens of the Anglican Parish of Ulladulla over the carparking area of the Church grounds. This was to alleviate the lack of public parking in the township of Milton until the Parking Strategy for Milton has been finalised.

Throughout the years, and more so during peak times, Milton traffic and the lack of parking becomes a major problem within the township.

A new license arrangement is now required and will commence on 16 March 2021 through to 14 February 2026. Any further term post 14 February 2026 will require approval from the Church Ordinance.

The diagram below shows the location of the carpark in black hatching on the corner of Princes Highway and Church St Milton.

 

Plan of Licensed area in black hatching

 

The negotiated agreement, subject to Council approval is based on the following:

 

Licensor

The Wardens o the Anglican Parish of Ulladulla (Church)

ABN: 99 407 643 753

Licensor’s address

PO Box 475

ULLADULLA NSW 2539

Parish

Anglican parish of Ulladulla

Church

Church of St Peter & St Paul Milton

Licensee

 

Shoalhaven City Council

ABN: 59 855 182 344

Licensee’s address

The CEO

PO Box 42

NOWRA NSW 2541

Term

Commencing Date: 16 March 2021

Termination Date: 14 February 2026

Property

Lot 11 DP 1225771 known as St Peter and St Pauls Anglian Church Milton (formally referred to as Lot 1 DP 780778)

Premises

As set out on the plan of licenced area in black hatching, for the avoidance of doubt excluding the toilets on the church hall.

Dyas and hours of use

There are no restriction except as provided in Clause 22 Special Conditions.

Licence Fee

$3,000 plus GST (three thousand dollars plus GST)

Permitted Use

Car parking - public

Public Liability

$10 million

Special Conditions

 

Community Engagement

The subject land is not owned by Council, therefore there is no requirement for any public notification resulting from this license proposal.

 

Policy Implications

Not applicable

 

Financial Implications

Council will be responsible for line marking and maintenance to keep the car park in good working condition.

Rental income of $3000 + GST per annum has been negotiated for the carpark area and will draw from Finance Project 101771 - Southern Local Roads.

 

Risk Implications

There are no risks to Council in continuing to occupy the car park premises.

 


 

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SA21.59     Appointment of Native Title Manager and Notification to Minister for Planning, Industry & Environment

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/106791

 

Department:       Technical Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services 

Attachments:     1.  Native Title Manager confirmation letter - Melissa Boundy   

Reason for Report

To provide Council with the opportunity to appoint the Senior Property Officer, Technical Services, City Services as Shoalhaven City Council’s Native Title Manager as required under Section 8.6 of the Crown Land Management Act 2016 (CLM Act 2016) and provide notice of same to the Minister under Section 8.8 of the CLM Act 2016.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

1.    Appoint Melissa Boundy Senior Property Officer, Technical Services, City Services, as Shoalhaven City Council’s Native Title Manager;

2.    Reconfirm appointment of the following relieving Native Title Managers in the absence of the Senior Property Officer, Technical Services, City Services:

a.    Property Officer – Amanda Walker; and

b.    Property Officer – Michelle Deudney.

3.    Advise the Minister for Planning, Industry & Environment as required by Section 8.8 of the Crown land Management Act 2016.

 

 

Options

1.    Resolve as recommended.

Implications: Council will meet its statutory obligation under the CLM Act 2016 to appoint a Native Title Manager and provide notification to the Minister.

 

2.    Not resolve as recommended.

Implications: Council will need to notify the Minister a Native Title Manager has not been appointed stating reasons why. This may delay the delivery of Council projects on Crown Land.

 

Background

Council’s recent organisation restructure resulted in the position of Property Unit Manager – Technical Services (previous Native Title Manager), lateral transfer to Strategic Property Manager – City Futures. The Native Title Manager position was directly associated with the Property Unit Manager position which now ceases to exist.

The restructure created a new position of Senior Property Officer – Technical Services, City Services, to undertake the functions of the previous Property Unit Manager role including Native Title Manager responsibilities. 

The CLM Act 2016 commenced 1 July 2018. The practice of managing Crown Lands in the Shoalhaven has changed significantly to comply with the requirements under the CLM Act 2016. One of the changes relates to a need for each Council to nominate a qualified Native Title Manager.

To be qualified as a Native Title Manager, the person must attend a training session prepared by the Crown Solicitors Office and the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (Crown Lands Office). The Senior Property Officer and Property Officers nominated have attained the Native Title Manager qualification.

 

Community Engagement

There is no requirement for community consultation.

 

Policy Implications

Section 8.8 of the CLM Act 2106 requires each Council to give notice to the Minister for Planning, Industry & Environment of the name and contact details of any person the Council has engaged or employed as a Native Title Manager. The notice must be given as soon as practicable after 30 June (but not later than 31 October) of each year.

Section 377(1) of the Local Government Act 1993 states that the giving of a notice to the Governor or Minister is a non-delegable function meaning a resolution of Council is required.

 

Financial Implications

There is no financial implication.

 

Risk Implications

The Senior Property Officer has attained the appropriate qualification and there is more than one staff member qualified to provide Native Title Management advice in times of staff leave.  There is nil risk.

 


 

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SA21.60     Waste Services - Fees and Charges - Requested Percentage Increase

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/120419

 

Department:       Commercial Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services  

Reason for Report

At the Waste Services Presentation to the Councillors Briefing the preliminary estimates of revenue required and options available to ensure environmental compliance, financial stability and service continuity were discussed. Waste Services has been requested to explore options for the 2021/2022 fees and charges.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.    Adopt a 7% increase to all Waste Service Fees and Charges as listed in the draft 2021/22 DPOP Fees and Charges to:

a.    Maintain all existing service levels

b.    Continue current free vouchers for waste services

c.    Provide two additional new green waste vouchers to the suite of free services

d.    Maintain working capital

e.    Deliver the 10 Year Capital Works Program, deferring the following projects and plant to 2022/23:

i.     Huskisson Hardstand $285k

ii.     Huskisson Relocation Offices $150k

iii.    West Nowra Fence $130k

iv.   West Nowra Waste Handler $400k

2.    Note subsequent years fees and charges percentage increases:

 If grant application is unsuccessful:

i.    2022/2023 – 7%

ii.    2023/2024 – 6%

If grant application is successful:

i.    2022/2023 – 5%

ii.    2023/2024 – 5%

 

 

Options

1.    Adopt the recommendation of 7% increase to Waste Services Fees and Charges for 2021/22. With subsequent years fees and charges increase of:

If grant application is unsuccessful:

i.    2022/2023 – 7%

ii.    2023/2024 – 6%

If grant application is successful:

i.    2022/2023 – 5%

ii.    2023/2024 – 5%

 

2.    Adopt a 9% increase to Waste Services Fees and Charges for 2021/22. With the following implications:

a.   Maintain all existing service levels

b.   Continue current free vouchers for waste services

c.   Provide two additional new green waste vouchers to the suite of free services

d.   Maintain working capital

e.   Deliver the original 10 Year Capital Works Program including the works deferred to 2022/23.

 

3.    Adopt a 5% increase to Waste Services Fees and Charges for 2021/22. With the following implications:

a.   Maintain all existing service levels

b.   No free green waste vouchers, however, maintenance of the existing suite of free services

c.   Deliver the 10 Year Capital Works Program, deferring the following projects and plant to 2022/23:

i.    Huskisson Hardstand $285k

ii.    Huskisson Relocation Offices $150k

iii.   West Nowra Fence $130k

iv.  West Nowra Waste Compactor $1M

d.   No increase in the Waste Reserve to recover from the natural disaster impact

 

Background

Waste Services is a self-funded unit of Council that provides the community with domestic waste services (kerbside collection, bulky waste removal and green waste removal), Recycling and Waste Depots, a landfill cell, associated waste services and waste education.

Waste Services preliminary proposal for a 9% fees and charges increase in 2021/22 ensured the provision of compliant and responsive services, continued asset maintenance and infrastructure development and a financially viable option.

All domestic waste charges are levied in accordance with Section 496 of the Local Government Act 1993. The charges are calculated in accordance with Section 501, 502 and 504 of the Act and must not exceed the reasonable cost to Council of providing domestic waste services. The NSW Office of Local Government’s Council Rating and Revenue Raising Manual requires that revenue from the Domestic Waste Management charge must be kept separate from general rating income, and only used for expenditure related to Domestic Waste Management. Of particular note is the IPART review which is continuing into domestic waste charges.

Tipping fees and ancillary fees and charges are calculated based on the costs of operation and charge as full cost recovery. 

Over the last two years Council, through the Waste Service, has supported the community through assistance during the natural disasters and COVID challenges. This assistance and new recycling contracts have impacted the Waste Reserve by in excess of $5.3M and has included:

·    Total Gate Revenue Loss (25,795 tonne) $1.606M

Green waste bushfire mitigation (6,946 tonne) $716k

Flood waste (224 tonne) $62k

Bushfire demolition (828 tonne) $322k

Bushfire demolition (PWA funded) (17,797 tonne) – cost neutral.

Vouchers Green Waste - $506k to end February 2021.

·    Recycling Costs Increase (2020/21) $1.5M

·    Domestic Waste Management Charge (COVID Relief Payments) – $2.2M

In 2021/22, Waste Service plans to continue to implement strategies and initiatives required under the Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Act (WARR) 2001 to minimise waste and reduce the environmental impact. This will be supported through the Capital Works Program totalling $32.2M. The projects include:

·    Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) - Up to $18M in 2021/22

·    Bioelektra - $7M in 2021/22

·    New Landfill Cell - $1.5M

·    Green Tiles Demonstration MICROfactorie™

(Only if grant application approved) $0.5M

·    Education Centre design only $0.5M

·    Leachate Management - $1.1M

·    Landfill Compactor - $1M

·    Minor Capital Works - $2.1

Council has applied for two grants for the MRF: firstly, a $13M Grant application to NSW government, Bushfire Local Economic Recovery Fund (BLERF), and secondly, a $10M Grant application to Federal Government, Building Better Regions Fund (BBRF). The grants are mutually exclusive with only one grant able to be accepted. Should either of the grants be successful the estimated 2022/23 loan repayments will reduce from ~$2.3M to ~$1.3M per year.

Fees and Charges are required to increase to meet the increasing cost of free services, the new loan repayments and incrementally replenish the Waste Reserve. The following free waste services will continue:

•     2 Waste Vouchers includes pick-up

•     Additional Recycling Service for six weeks over Christmas

•     Mulch

•     Fire Weed Disposal

•     Drop off:

Ø Polystyrene

Ø Electronic Waste

Ø Sorted Mixed Recyclables

Ø Scrap Steel

Ø Paint & Oils

Ø Batteries & Light Globes

Additionally, Council has indicated that a new free service i.e. two green waste vouchers, would be considered as part of the 2021/22 budget.

In response to the request from the Councillors Briefing, the following options have been investigated. The primary underpinning considerations have been:

·    Compliance with legislative and licence requirements

·    Capability to provide existing services to the community and depots

·    Maintenance of the existing free services

·    Ensuring asset integrity and future service delivery capability

·    Delivery and consideration of potential one year deferral of components of the 10 Year Capital Works Program

·    Consideration of the new free green waste vouchers

·    An appropriate increase while ensuring prices are affordable to the community and in line with pricing of other neighbouring Councils.

The following options have been developed based on funding capital projects through loans, waste operations and the waste reserve. Should grant application prove successful, the percentage increase in subsequent years will be reduced.

 

Option One – Increase of 7%

·      Maintain all existing service levels

·      Continue current free vouchers for waste services

·      Provide two additional new green waste vouchers to the suite of free services

·      Maintain working capital

·      Deliver the 10 Year Capital Works Program, deferring the following projects and plant to 2022/23:

i.     Huskisson Hardstand $285k

ii.     Huskisson Relocation Offices $150k

iii.    West Nowra Fence $130k

iv.   West Nowra Waste Handler $400k

·    Subsequent Year Increases

2022/2023 – 7%

2023/2024 – 6%

 

Option Two – Increase of 9%

·      Maintain all existing service levels

·      Continue current free vouchers for waste services

·      Provide two additional new green waste vouchers to the suite of free services

·      Maintain working capital

·      Deliver the original 10 Year Capital Works Program including the works deferred to 2022/23.

·      Initial contribution to the Waste Reserve to incrementally re-establish the capability to respond to natural and other disasters

·      Subsequent Year Increases:

2022/2023 – 5%

2023/2024 – 5%

 

Option Three – Increase of 5%

·      Maintain all existing service levels

·      No free green waste vouchers, however, the existing suite of free services maintained

·      No increase in the Waste Reserve to recover from the natural disaster impact

·      Reduce ability to respond to community needs such as disaster recovery

·      Deliver the 10 Year Capital Works Program, deferring the following projects and plant to 2022/23:

i.     Huskisson Hardstand $285k

ii.     Huskisson Relocation Offices $150k

iii.    West Nowra Fence $130k

iv.   West Nowra Waste Handler $400k

v.    West Nowra Waste Compactor $1M

·    Subsequent Year Increases:

2022/2023 – 7.5 %

2023/2024 – 7 %

Reduction in the percentage increase to all options will occur if grant funding is successful. This proposed percentage increases are shown below for a successful $10M grant application.

 

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

2021/2022

7.00%

9.00%

5.00%

2022/2023

5.00%

3.00%

5.50%

2023/2024

5.00%

3.00%

4.00%

 


 

Financial Implications

Financial Impact to Community (2021/2022)

 

2021/2022

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Domestic Waste Management Charge

Current Year

7%

9%

5%

Standard Service 120ltr

$385.00

$412.00

$420.00

$404.00

1st 240ltr Service

$670.00

$717.00

$730.00

$703.50

Landfill Gate Fee

 

 

 

 

Mixed Waste Charge  (per 100kg)

$38.90

$41.50

$42.40

$40.80

Domestic Trailer (per trailer)

$77.00

$82.00

$84.00

$81.00

Domestic Car (per car)

$20.00

$21.40

$21.80

$21.00

Green Waste Charge (per 100 kg

$11.00

$11.80

$12.00

$11.60

2022/2023

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Domestic Waste Management Charge

 

6%

5%

7.5%

Standard Service 120ltr

 

$437.00

$441.00

$434.00

1st 240ltr Service

 

$760.00

$767.00

$756.00

Landfill Gate Fee

 

 

 

 

Mixed Waste Charge (per 100kg)

 

$44.00

$44.50

$43.90

Domestic Trailer (per trailer)

 

$87.00

$88.00

$87.00

Domestic Car (per car)

 

$22.70

$22.90

$22.60

Green Waste Charge (per 100 kg

 

$12.50

$12.60

$12.50

2023/2024

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Domestic Waste Management Charge

 

6%

5%

7%

Standard Service 120ltr

 

$463.00

$463.00

$464.00

1st 240ltr Service

 

$806.00

$805.00

$809.00

Landfill Gate Fee

 

 

 

 

Mixed Waste Charge  (per 100kg)

 

$46.60

$46.70

$47.00

Domestic Trailer (per trailer)

 

$92.20

$92.40

$93.10

Domestic Car (per car)

 

$24.10

$24.00

$24.20

Green Waste Charge (per 100 kg

 

$13.30

$13.20

$13.40

 

To ensure prices are affordable to the community and are in line with other waste providers, price comparison have been conducted across similar councils. This table highlights that Shoalhaven City Council is able to increase prices and remain reasonably priced across the councils.

 

Waste Services Charges Comparison (2020/2021)

 

Shoalhaven

Kiama

Shellharbour

Wollongong

Wingecarribee

Lake Macquarie

120L Bin Service Equivalent

$385/y

$590/y

$430/y

$411/y

$540/y

$400/y

240L Bin Service Equivalent

$670/y

$790/y

$570/y

$677/y

$698/y

$451/y

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Waste Disposal

$389/t

n/a

$398/t

$384/t

$340/t

$400/t

Mixed Waste Trailer

77

n/a

n/a

$117.00

n/a

n/a

Green Waste Disposal

$110/t

n/a

$220/t

$126/t

$123/t

$165/t

Green Waste Trailer

30

$28.00

n/a

$38.00

n/a

n/a

 

Working Capital Calculations

Below is the working capital calculation for the Waste Management Reserve. The recommended increases will maintain the Reserve close to the benchmark. Please note that a 7% increase in fees and charges may require borrowing from internal reserves to fund the temporary working capital shortfall during the 2022/23 financial year.

 

 

Successful Grant Application

Unsuccessful Grant Application

2022

2023

2024

2022

2023

2024

7.0%

5.0%

5.0%

7.0%

7.0%

6.0%

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Current Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

3,640

3,115

4,232

4,140

3,858

4,209

Receivables

788

788

788

788

788

788

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payables

1,610

1,659

1,708

1,610

1,659

1,708

Borrowings

1,868

1,901

1,936

2,789

2,839

2,891

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Working Capital Available

951

343

1,376

529

148

398

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benchmark

788

788

788

788

788

788

In relation to the benchmark indicated above, Councillors will recall the General Fund working capital calculation established in the 2020/21 DPOP based on an amount equivalent to value of receivables plus inventory. For consistency a similar approach has been used to the determine the Waste Management working capital and benchmark.

 

Risk Implications

The capability to provide assistance to the community is limited due to the $5.3M draw down on the Waste Reserve in recent years.

The inability to deliver projects within the 10 year capital program may result in increased expenditure due to increased operating costs for exporting recycling materials out of the region and potential non-compliance of landfill licensing conditions. 

The deferral of replacement of substantial plant will have three impacts, firstly increased maintenance; secondly, the increased potential for failure and finally reduced resale values.

 

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.61     Tenders - Supply Slow Speed Shredder

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/110628

 

Department:       Commercial Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services  

Reason for Report

To inform Council of the tender process for Supply of a Slow Speed Shredder for Waste Services..

In accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993, some information should remain confidential as it would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. It is not in the public interest to disclose this information as it may reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional or financial interests. This information will be considered under a separate confidential report.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council consider a separate confidential report in accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Details

Tenders for the above were invited by listing on Tenderlink and advertised through Sydney Morning Herald for a period of three weeks, ending 23 February 2021. A previous Request for Quotation process via Local Government Procurement failed to produce a suitable supplier. The tender covers the supply of a Slow Speed Shredder to meet the operational requirements of Waste Services.

Tenders Received

Tenders were received from the following:

Tenderer

Location

BT Equipment (Metso)

Sydney NSW

CEA Equipment Pty Ltd (Komptech)

Sydney NSW

GCM Enviro Pty Ltd (Tana)

Sydney NSW

Finlay Pty Ltd (Terex)

Burpengary Qld

 

Details relating the evaluation of the tenders are contained in the confidential report.

 

Financial Implications:

Adequate funds have been allocated in the Waste Management Plant Replacement budget 20-21 for this purchase.

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.62     Tender - Hillcrest Avenue South Nowra - Road Rehabilitation

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/106808

 

Department:       Works & Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services  

Reason for Report

To inform Council of the tender process for Hillcrest Avenue South Nowra Road Rehabilitation.

In accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993, some information should remain confidential as it would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. It is not in the public interest to disclose this information as it may reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional or financial interests. This information will be considered under a separate confidential report.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council consider a separate confidential report in accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Options

1.    Accept the recommendation and consider the matter in a confidential setting

Implications: The Hillcrest Ave Road construction works may be undertaken in a timely manner.

 

2.    Council could choose not to accept the recommendation, and select a different contractor, giving reasons.

Implications: This is not recommended as an extensive tender evaluation, comprising price and non-price criteria, has been undertaken in accordance with the Tender Evaluation Plan.

 

Details

Council has requested tenders for the Hillcrest Avenue, South Nowra (Ch0.36 km -1.35 km) Full-Service Pavement Rehabilitation on Thursday 25 February 2021 which closed at 10:00am on Monday 8 March 2021. Two (2) tenders were received at the time of closing.

The full-service package of works comprises the rehabilitation of the eastbound carriageway and parking lane between chainage 360m and 820m and full width construction to chainage 1350m.

 

Tenders Received

Tenders were received from the following:

Tenderer

Location

North Shore Paving Co Pty Ltd

Lindfield NSW

Downer EDI Works Pty Ltd

Rosehill NSW

 

Details relating the evaluation of the tenders are contained in the confidential report.

 

Community Engagement:

Nil

 

Policy Implications

Nil

 

Financial Implications:

The total budget for this project is $1.05M (Council contribution from the general fund).

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.63     Tenders - Demolition & Construction of an Accessible Boardwalk - Ray Brooks Reserve

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/120979

 

Department:       Technical Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services   

Reason for Report

To allow Council to consider the Tender Evaluation Panel’s recommendation concerning Tender Reference 66485E – Demolition & Construction of an Accessible Boardwalk – Ray Brooks Reserve.

In accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993, some information should remain confidential as it would, if disclosed, prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it. It is not in the public interest to disclose this information as it may reveal commercial-in-confidence provisions of a contract, diminish the competitive commercial value of any information to any person and/or prejudice any person’s legitimate business, commercial, professional, or financial interests. This information will be considered under a separate confidential report.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council consider a separate confidential report in accordance with Section 10A(2)(d)(i) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Options

1.    Accept the recommendation and consider the matter in a confidential setting.

2.    Defer the matter to a Councillor Briefing.

 

Background

Council obtained grant funding via the LCRA Phase 1 grant to renew the existing 30 year old timber boardwalk at Palm Beach, Sanctuary Point.

Council called Tenders for the Demolition and Construction of an Accessible Boardwalk on 15 February 2021 which closed at 10:00am on 23 March 2021. 

Works include the demolition of the existing timber boardwalk, construction of an accessible composite boardwalk and associated concrete works at Ray Brooks Reserve, Palm Beach, Sanctuary Point to improve access to the reserve.

 

Details

Tenders Received

Tenders were received from the following:

Tenderer

Location

BY Group Pty Ltd

Sydney (tender also notes an office in Sanctuary Point)

Frontier Assembly Pty Ltd

Wishart, Queensland

 

Details relating the evaluation of the tenders are contained in the confidential report.

 

Policy Implications

Nil for this report.

 

Financial Implications:

Refer to Confidential Report.

 

Risk Implications

Refer to Confidential Report.

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.64     Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre Progress Update

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/130644

 

Department:       Building Services

Approver:           Paul Keech, Director - City Services  

Reason for Report

To inform Council of the progress on the Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre Improvements and anticipated financial implications for completing future works.

In accordance with Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 2003, this report shall remain confidential as it contains information, that would if disclosed confer a commercial advantage of a person whom council is conducting business. It is not in the public interest to disclose this information as it may impact on the ability of Council to undertake works in the future. This information will be considered under a separate confidential report.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority) 

That Council consider a separate confidential report in accordance with Section 10A(2)(c) of the Local Government Act 1993.

 

 

Options

1.    Council accept the recommendation as presented.

Implications:

Council proceed with the design and installation of the Fire Suppression (Sprinkler) system and in doing so reduce the quantity of additional BCA compliance measures to be addressed. This option provides additional building protection of property and occupants. Council issue a new fire safety order enabling the works to proceed within a two year duration which satisfies F&RNSW requirements. Also enables building to reopen to public in May 2021.

 

2.    Council amend the recommendation.

Implications:

Council risks not complying with the standing emergency fire safety order and advice issued by Fire & Rescue NSW; therefore, jeopardising reopening of the Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre in May 2021.

 

Background

Councillors will recall a briefing on the Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre (SEC) upgrade works in May 2020. Following the Councillor Briefing a report was presented to the Ordinary Meeting of Council on 26 May 2020 which recommended a staged implementation program for the building compliance and upgrade works and the establishment of a Councillor Reference Group to provide feedback, resolve design details and give direction to staff. This meeting also outlined an overall project budget of $4.85M. Council subsequently resolved, at the Strategy & Assets Committee meeting on the 11 August 2020 (MIN20.566C), as follows.

            That Council:

1.    Note that the progress on the works associated with Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre as follows:

a.    Stage 1- Alucobond cladding replacement - Construction Ready

b.    Stage 2- Building Code of Australia (BCA) alterations - Construction Ready

c.    Stage 3a - Building improvement – Still under investigation

d.    Stage 3b - Technical and WHS upgrades – Still under investigation

e.    Stage 4- Kingspan cladding replacement - Construction Ready

 

Council most recently considered the Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre project on 24 November 2020 (confidential and open report) when the Builders Contract for Stage1 works was formally awarded to Duratec Ltd. Soon after compound fencing was erected and works on site commenced.

Since that time the staging has changed to maximise the extent of works undertaken during the COVID restricted period, to optimise the benefits of completing works while the Centre is shut down and to minimise the level of continued disruption to the ongoing operations of the SEC.

While building compliance has been the primary focus (mainly related to cladding), the opportunity to facilitate significant building and equipment improvements has also been seen as an important community outcome.

The current stage 1 works (under construction) and as endorsed by Council in November 2020 combines all the earlier Stage 1 cladding replacement, substantial elements of the previous Stage 3 (a) and (b) improvements (e.g. Cafe renovation, audio and visual upgrades) as well as part of the Stage 4 Kingspan cladding replacement. The extent of the compliance works have been guided by expert Fire Safety Engineers Report (AED) recommendations and the most serious non-compliances will be addressed as part of the first Stage.

Progress on the Stage 1 works is progressing well and Duratec are confident they will complete their contract on time at the end of April 2021. In other words, the SEC is on target to re-open for normal operations during May this year.

However, significant components of the overall project need to be completed over coming years and additional funding will need to be allocated to facilitate these works. Consideration is also being given to planned future short closures during low season (January/February 2022 and potentially January/February 2023) for the next 2-3 years, if necessary, to enable additional works to be completed with minimal operational disruption. Other options are being investigated contingent on the works required and determining whether any aspects of this can be undertaken whilst the Centre is operational.

 

Community Engagement

Community engagement is being addressed through consultation with key stakeholders, including the Shoalhaven Arts Board.

A detailed communications strategy and plan has been developed and is being implemented covering all aspects of the project, advising of any change to current operations and implementation of alternative arrangements. The aim to ensure customers and the community are kept informed with relevant information and contact details.

 

Policy Implications

Included within the confidential report.

 

Financial Implications

Included within the confidential report.

 

Risk Implications

Included within the confidential report.

  


 

SA21.65     Nowra Showground - Potential Grants and Project Update

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/48332

 

Department:       Community Planning & Projects

Approver:           Kevin Norwood, Manager - Shoalhaven Swim Sport Fitness  

Reason for Report

To provide a report back to Council on the capacity to attract grant funding for heritage works and works of a general nature at Nowra Showground in response to MIN21.29.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.    Accept the Nowra Showground report for information.

2.    Continue to advocate for funding for improvements at Nowra Showground to State and Federal Government.

3.    Continue to collaborate with Nowra Show Society and other key stakeholders on the delivery of projects and developing grant applications.

 

 

Options

1.    Adopt the recommendation.

Implications: The recommendation acknowledges the work that has been undertaken and is ongoing at Nowra Showground

 

2.    Adopt an alternative recommendation.

Implications: Depending on the nature of the alternative recommendation, it may require additional staff resourcing and funding which are not currently available or planned for within City Lifestyles Directorate

 

Background

Nowra Showground is the largest of Shoalhaven’s four Showgrounds, comprising a range of significant buildings and other facilities, including several with important heritage values.

The easily accessible location of Nowra Showground and its proximity to the Shoalhaven River makes it a popular destination for a range of public as well as private events and other ongoing activities such as camping and day use pursuits.

The Showground consists of both Council-managed Crown Land (Reserve No D580011) and Council owned Community land. It contains:

·    A significant Pavilion building with capacity for up to 200 people

·    A Committee Room with capacity for up to 70 people

·    Main Arena with grandstand and substantial floodlighting

·    Six tennis courts with clubhouse

·    Two cricket ovals which also accommodate AFL and Rugby League.

·    Horse / cattle stables as well as a substantial area of open space

At its Ordinary Meeting on 25 January 2021, Council resolved (MIN21.29):

That Council staff prepare a report on its capacity to attract both heritage grants as well as grants of a general nature, necessary to bring the infrastructure at Nowra Showground up to a standard in line with community expectations.

The purpose of this report is to provide a report back to Council on the capacity to attract grant funding at Nowra Showground, whilst providing a general update on various improvements and infrastructure projects recently completed and currently underway.

 

Potential Grant Funding

A number of heritage and general grant funds offered by State and Federal Government agencies are available throughout the year, including:

·    Heritage Specific Grant Programs

NSW Heritage Grants – for identification, conservation and promotion of heritage and generally available each one to three years via Heritage NSW

Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Grants – for identification, conservation and promotion of heritage and generally available each one to three years via Heritage NSW

Community War Memorials Fund – to help conserve, protect and repair war memorials at least once a year via NSW Office of Veterans Affairs

·    General Grant Programs

Building Better Regions – to facilitate job creation, drive economic growth, build stronger regional country communities and generally available annually via the Federal Government’s Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Stronger Country Communities Fund – to facilitate delivery of local projects in regional communities and generally available annually via the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet

ClubGrants – enables delivery of local community services, programs and projects and generally available twice a year via NSW Office of Liquor and Gaming

Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Program – part of the Federal Government’s COVID-19 Stimulus package and aims to deliver priority local road and community infrastructure projects across Australia, supporting jobs and resilience of local economies – generally available annually via the Federal Governments Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Bushfire Local Economic Recovery Fund – part of the bushfire support that is co-funded by Federal and NSW Governments for bushfire recovery, response and preparedness and generally available annually via the NSW Department of Regional NSW

Crown Reserves Improvement Fund – this program supports Crown land managers to undertake repairs / maintenance projects, pest and weed control, delivery of new recreational infrastructure or environmental initiatives. The program is generally available annually via the NSW Department of Planning, Infrastructure and Environment - Crown Lands.

NSW Government Showground Stimulus Funding Package Rounds 1 and 2 – this program funds maintenance and improvement works at showgrounds around NSW. The program is provided to stimulate economic growth over short-term timeframes in local economies impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Successful Grant Funding and Project Roll Out

A number of grant applications have been submitted by Council for various improvements, upgrades and new infrastructure at Nowra Showground under State and Federal Grant programs. These include, but are not limited to:

·    Local Roads and Community Infrastructure Grant Program

·    Stronger Country Communities Fund

·    Regional Growth - Environment and Tourism Fund

·    Crown Reserves Improvement Fund

In the last three years, over $1.7million in grant funding and Council budget allocations has been obtained under these grant programs for delivery of the following works:

·     Cattle arena fence

·     Cattle loading ramp

·     Spectator seating

·     Drainage – cattle wash down

·     Boundary fence

·     Horse stables – safety / ventilation mesh

·     Concept design – new amenities, kitchen

·     Cattle yard fencing

·     Seating

·     Mesh in stables

·     Perimeter fencing

·     Cattle ramp improvements

·     Floodlighting, including floodlight controller

·     Irrigation

 

Pending Grant Applications

Council recently made a grant application under the Community War Memorials Fund, provided by NSW Department of Communities and Justice – Office of Veterans Affairs. The application was for a heritage assessment to the value of approximately $10,000 for the Junction Street Memorial Gates to guide future repairs / works after it was damaged. This application is pending determination.

A grant funding submission has also been made under the Bushfire Local Economic Recovery Fund for improvement across all 4 showgrounds to the value of $4,035,367 of which $1,140,484 is for Nowra Showground to deliver various improvements including new amenities, solar system, LED/Solar lighting with mobile charging stations and a new camp kitchen.

 

Additional Works / Projects at Nowra Showground

Plan of Management and Masterplan

Council is currently preparing a new Plan of Management and Masterplan for Nowra Showground as part of the legislated Crown Lands Review process. This is also in recognition of the Showground’s changing needs and changes in context of the surrounding area, including the growing suburban footprint and historical significance of the site.

Council has undertaken preliminary relevant consultation in February 2021 which included consultation with key stakeholders and the broader community. The consultation undertaken highlighted the community investment in Nowra Showground, and desire to capitalise on its strengths as a valued community asset. 

There is potential within the Plan of Management and Masterplan to identify additional works beyond that which is currently underway and / or planned at Nowra Showground. Any works identified will be consistent with identified values, and feedback on the Showground’s future direction as provided by key stakeholders and community during the preliminary consultation.  Identifying a scope of works through these documents is necessary to allow the works to be undertaken under relevant Local Government and Crown Lands Management legislation.

It is anticipated that this will be submitted to the Minister for Crown Lands to proceed to public exhibition in April 2021. A report will be submitted to Council to proceed to public exhibition upon receipt of the Ministers concurrence.

Projects Underway

Council is working towards delivering several other projects within Nowra Showground, of which the total project value is approximately $1.1M. These projects are at various stages, and include the following:

·           Family Café and Judges Box

·     Cattle Shed

·     Pavilion Landscape Plan

·     Fire compliance

·     Internal road network

·     Pavilion painting and re-roofing

·     Flood light towers

·     Hanging Rock Facelift and Historical Signs (subject to Plan of Management and Masterplan)

·     Upgrade to Public Address System (with Nowra Show Society)

 

Internal Road Network

It has been widely recognised that Nowra Showground’s internal road network requires a range of improvements. The following items have been identified for Nowra Showground maintenance repairs and are programmed to commence in early April 2021, weather permitting. Major resealing works are to be identified in the Long Term Financial Plan and placed in a shovel-ready state to allow for grant opportunities.

1.    Immediate bitumen patching already undertaken

2.    Gravel Internal Roads:

a.    Gravel (200t) to be stockpiled and used to repair washouts / scours / shoulders and gravel roads

b.    Re-instate shoulders / table drains (where possible) including removal of built-up material

c.    Bitumen seal repair works on various internal access roads

d.    Estimated cost of the above is $30,000

3.    Major Resealing costs within highlighted locations

a.    Northern sealed section

·    Resurfacing 5,000m2 - $35,000

·    Patching works - $5,000

 

 

b.    Southern sealed section

·    Resurfacing 1,500m2 - $10,000

·    Patching works - $5,000

 

 

 

Total resurfacing cost + $5,000 contingency = $60,000

Resurfacing works are seasonally influenced and would need to be undertaken between October - April in the warmer months. This work would need to be planned prior to October 2021.

 

Governance / Stakeholder Relationships

Council recognises that the Nowra community is diverse and will be engaging a consultation process which enables key user groups, individuals in the community and Council staff to voice their ideas. 

In late 2020, Council transitioned to the new Asset Custodian Model, resulting in operational management being placed with Shoalhaven Swim Sport Fitness within City Lifestyles, with Community Planning and Projects being responsible for strategic planning. The new Asset Custodian Model now provides stakeholders and customers with a single point of contact for all enquiries relating to Nowra Showground.

To date, Shoalhaven Swim Sport Fitness officers are developing strong relationships with all stakeholders and have conveyed the new Model and relevant staff contacts. To ensure that relationships are further developed, Council officers are meeting with external stakeholder groups on a monthly basis, to allow each stakeholder the opportunity to voice their concerns and to contribute to the Works Program.

In discussions with various user groups, all are in support of a Council officer being instated to undertake caretaker / coordination of Showground maintenance duties. At time of writing this report, Council officers are current reviewing options for maintenance and upkeep of Nowra Showground precinct.

Council’s three other Showgrounds –Berry, Kangaroo Valley and Milton – continue to operate under delegation of S355 Management Committees which are responsible for day-to-day operations at these three Showgrounds.

The four Show Societies throughout Shoalhaven take an active interest in their facilities’ operations, in order to support their Showgrounds’ suitability for the annual agricultural shows.

 

Community Engagement

At Council’s Strategy & Assets Meeting held 13 June 2017, it was resolved to establish a S355 Management Committee at Nowra Showground. Council approached user groups seeking membership nominations. Nowra Showground user groups, including Nowra Show Society, did not wish to assume delegated authority for Showground operational management; therefore, it has continued under Council’s management.

The option to establish a caretaker / coordinator role at Nowra Showground is being investigated. Such a role would have operational oversight of Nowra Showground, be a point of contact for users, further activate the precinct and develop income streams through such activities as events and overnight stays (camping, caravans, RVs etc.). The appointment of a Caretaker / Coordinator will also assist in compliance, maintain a point of contact for Ranger Services and provide onsite reactive cleaning and maintenance.

Community engagement plays an essential role in each of the projects which have been completed, are currently underway, or planned, at Nowra Showground. The establishment of Project Control Groups for individual projects has allowed Council staff to engage with relevant stakeholders and facilitate effective and efficient delivery of projects.

These forums enable clear and direct communication between internal staff, external stakeholders and consultants (where relevant), to discuss key project concerns / issues and address matters which require further direction / consideration.

 

Nowra Showground Ideas Day

In March 2017 Council staff facilitated an ideas day at Nowra Showground. The consultation provided an opportunity to the community and key stakeholders to identify key issues and areas for improvement. The key priorities as conveyed by the community and key stakeholders were as follows:

·    Introduction of a Caretaker

·    Management of the camping area and other land uses

·    Improving the cleanliness and overall visual amenity and appeal of the Nowra Showground

·    Improving the internal road network

·    Addressing homelessness

To date, the key priorities as identified above have been actioned, are currently in progress or will form part of the Plan of Management and Master Plan.

 

Stakeholders

Nowra Showground is an important public space used by many people, both Shoalhaven residents and visitors. This multi-functional site – a major recreational centre in Nowra – is of high social value for past and present generations dating back to 1886, and these include:

 

·   Nowra Show Society

·    NSW Holstein Association

·    South Coast Beef Producers Association

·    Nowra Jets Rugby League

·    Nowra Cricket Club

·    Shoalhaven Dog Club

·    Bomaderry AFL

·    Nowra Poultry Club

·    Nowra Croquet Club

·    Nowra Men’s Shed

 

Financial Implications

The current operational budget allocated to Nowra Showground is as follows:

 

Income

Expenses

Licence / Leasing

22,692

Amenities cleaning / grounds maintenance / minor building maintenance

197,000

Camping

59,862

Sportsground / Building hire

100,025

Total

$182,579

Total

$197,000

 

 

 

Summary of Grant Funding

 

Received / Granted $

 

$1,700,000 (Approx).

Pending $

 

$1,150,000 (Approx).

 

Additional budgets may be necessary to accommodate any additional projects, or to provide matching funding / co-contributions for grant applications at Nowra Showground. These can be addressed through quarterly budget reviews, or reports to Council, on an ‘as needs’ basis.  Options to provide caretaker / coordinator functions to support the development and growth of new opportunities, activation and income streams are currently being explored.

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.66     Request for Plaques and Memorials - Plaques and Memorials Policy

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/93797

 

Department:       Community Planning & Projects

Approver:           Kevin Norwood, Manager - Shoalhaven Swim Sport Fitness 

Attachments:     1.  Detailed Information - Requests for Plaques and Memorials (councillors information folder)   

Reason for Report

To seek Council approval via a resolution for the requests for nine (9) plaques to be installed within the public domain in Berry, Currarong, Huskisson, Vincentia, Narrawallee, Bendalong, Ulladulla and Sanctuary Point in accordance with the Plaques and Memorials Policy.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council:

1.    As per the Plaques and Memorials Policy:

a.    Approve the request for a new seat and plaque at Princess Street Reserve, Berry.

b.    Approve the request for a replacement seat and plaque at Berry Showground within the Swimming Pool grounds, Berry

c.    Approve the request for a plaque at Moona Moona Creek Reserve, Huskisson.

d.    Approve the request for a plaque at Collingwood Beach Reserve, Vincentia.

e.    Approve the request for a new seat and plaque at Matron Porter Drive / Narrawallee Inlet Reserve, Narrawallee.

f.     Approve the request for a plaque at Bendalong Boat Ramp, Bendalong.

g.    Approve the request for a new seat and plaque at Paradise Beach Reserve, (Sanctuary Point Public Reserve) Sanctuary Point.

h.    Approve the request for a new seat and plaque at Booree Street Car Park, Ulladulla.

i.      Approve the request for a new seat and plaque at Elliott Reserve, Currarong.

2.    Advise the applicants of Council’s determination of the requests.

 

 

 

Options

1.    Adopt the recommendation.

Implications: This is consistent with the adopted Plaques and Memorials Policy and will allow staff to advise the applicants of the outcome of their request.

 

2.    Adopt an alternative recommendation.

Implications: An alternative recommendation may be inconsistent with the Plaques and Memorials Policy.

 

Background

As per the adopted Plaques and Memorials Policy (POL19/70), Council staff have received a number of requests to install a plaque in memory of a person on Council owned and/or managed land. This report summarises the requests received, identifies whether they are for new infrastructure or existing and whether the request is consistent with the adopted Policy.

The requests received are located in various areas within Shoalhaven and are addressed in the next section of this report. In accordance with the adopted Plaques and Memorials Policy (POL19/70), a Council resolution is required to approve the installation of a plaque or memorial.

 

Consideration of Requests - Plaques and Memorials Policy

Council has received nine (9) requests for plaques on Council owned and / or managed land. These are summarised in Table 1 below.  Additional detail of the individual requests is provided within the Councillors Information Folder to ensure that these requests are managed sensitively.

 

Table 1 – Summary of Requests for Plaques

 

Infrastructure Request

Preferred Location

Consistency with Policy

1

New Seat and Plaque

Berry Township

Yes

2

Replacement Seat and Plaque

Berry Village Pool – Berry Showground, Berry

Yes

3

Plaque only

Moona Moona Creek Reserve, Huskisson

Yes

4

Plaque only

Collingwood Beach Reserve, Vincentia

Yes

5

New Seat and Plaque or Picnic Table and Plaque

Matron Porter Drive / Narrawallee Inlet Reserve, Narrawallee

Yes

6

Plaque only

Bendalong Boat Ramp, Bendalong

Yes

7

New Seat and Plaque

Paradise Beach Reserve, Sanctuary Point (sanctuary Point public Reserve)

Yes

8

New Seat and Plaque

Booree Street Car Park, Ulladulla

Yes

9

New Seat and Plaque

Elliott Reserve, Currarong

Yes

 

Policy Implications

The requests received have been considered in line with the criteria contained within the adopted Plaques and Memorials Policy.

As per the approval process of the Policy, a Council resolution is required to approve the installation of the plaque or memorial. 

Each application is generally consistent with the Plaques and Memorials Policy and is therefore recommended to be supported. Where applications have been for ‘townships’, Council staff have negotiated with the applicant to determine a specific location, this is detailed in the attachment.

 

Financial Implications

As per the adopted Plaques and Memorials Policy, the delivery of the requests will be funded by the applicant, however Council will be responsible for maintenance and operational costs.

The Asset Custodian for each of the preferred locations of each requests has considered each individual request and noted that the maintenance and operation of the new infrastructure will be managed within existing Operational Budgets.

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.67     Acceptance of Grant Funding - Everyone Can Play 2020/21 - Variety Livvi's Place Playspace Marriott Park

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/99342

 

Department:       Community Connections

Approver:           Kevin Norwood, Manager - Shoalhaven Swim Sport Fitness 

Attachments:     1.  Final concept plans - Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace

2.  Cost Estimate - Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace (councillors information folder)   

Reason for Report  To inform Council of a successful funding application to Everyone Can Play 2020/21 for the delivery of the first stage of the Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace within Marriott Park, Nowra.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council receive this report for information on the successful funding application to Everyone Can Play 2020/21 for $300,000 towards the delivery of Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace, Marriott Park.

 

 

Options

1. Adopt the recommendation.

Implications: This will allow for the progression of the delivery of the Playspace within Marriott Park, in line with the community’s expectation.

 

2. Council adopt an alternative recommendation.

Implications: Depending on the nature of the alternative recommendation, this may not meet community expectations and potentially result in the funding being withdrawn, and the delivery of the Playspace within Marriott Park being delayed and pending other future funding.

 

Background

In conjunction with the Marriott Park Master Plan, in 2019 Council partnered with Variety NSW ACT to develop a design an Inclusive Playspace in Marriott Park, Nowra. This design was the result of a successful grant application under the Variety – Livvi’s Place Design Grant.

This project enabled Variety, on behalf of Council, to engage Ayling and Drury Landscape Architects to prepare the concept design for the Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace within Marriott Park. Consultation with users of the existing Playspace, relevant stakeholders, and broader community was undertaken to inform the design of the draft concept plan.

The Playspace is nature based with strong local landscape and Aboriginal themes. Key materials include sandstone, hardwood timber, and native vegetation representing the landscape of the Shoalhaven River. The Playspace is fully inclusive and includes different precincts for nature play, imaginative play, sensory play, quiet places, and adventurous activities. The Playspace concept is included as Attachment 1.

The Marriott Park Master Plan and the concept of the Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace were reported to Council’s Strategy and Assets Committee on 21 July 2020. It was resolved (MIN20.489):

That Council:

1.    Note the adoption of the Marriott Park Master Plan following the Public Exhibition period in accordance with MIN20.31

2.    Undertake community consultation on the Draft Concept Plan – Livvi’s Place Inclusive Playspace – Marriott Park; and

a.    If no significant feedback is received as part of the community consultation, the Draft Concept Plan – Variety Livvi’s Place Playground – Marriott Park be finalised and deemed adopted; or

b.    If significant adverse feedback is received, update the Draft Concept Plan – Variety Livvi’s Place Playground – Marriott Park and report the outcomes of the public exhibition period to Council prior to adoption.

3.    Advocate for funding to deliver Marriott Park improvements as per the adopted Marriott Park Master Plan.

The exhibition of the Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace concept received no significant adverse feedback, and as a result, the Playspace Concept Design was adopted.

Since the adoption of the Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace, Council has been investigating and preparing funding applications to assist the delivery of the project. An application to the NSW Everyone Can Play grant was submitted by Council in November 2020.

 

Everyone Can Play Funding

The Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace has been designed so that it can be delivered in a staged approach, or in its entirety, depending on future funding and the success of grant applications with other government departments. Due to the scale and cost estimate of the new Playspace, Council have proposed to fund the delivery in two stages. The funding application under Everyone Can Play was for one stage of the Playspace.

In March 2021, Council was informed that their application to Everyone Can Play 2020/21 to the value of $300,000 was successful. The funding agreement has been signed and returned, under the delegation assigned to the Director - City Lifestyles.

The funding received is $300,000 from the Everyone Can Play program, with matching contribution which is included in the Council’s Community Planning and Projects team current budget. The works covered by the successful grant application include the upper terrace of the Playspace, nature trail, lawn terrace, circular seating nooks, Black Cockatoo sculpture, picnic shelters, inclusive access, creek bed with sandstone blocks, musical instruments, accessible play shelter / tunnel and entry / footpaths.

The funding received from Everyone Can Play requires the project to be completed within 18 months of the finalisation and acceptance of the funding agreement.

 

Community Engagement

Variety and Council staff worked in collaboration to consult with the community to inform the concept design of the Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace. The consultation included community surveys, workshops, school visits, and a pop-up stall on site to determine the community’s needs and desires for a new Playspace in Marriott Park.

The consultation results were used to prepare the concept design of the Variety Livvi’s Place Playspace. Further consultation was conducted during the public exhibition, to determine the level of support of the draft concept design. As a result of the exhibition, it was concluded that there was a high level of support for the Playspace, and the design was adopted.

The progression of the project is consistent with the 2021/22 Delivery Plan Operation Plan Action which specifies the implementation of Marriott Park Master Plan and Livvi’s Place Inclusive Playspace as a priority project, and specifically that the project progress to “Prepare plans and advocate for funding for Marriott Park improvements” (Action 1.1.02.01).

 

Policy Implications

The Community Infrastructure Strategic Plan (CISP) recognises Marriott Park as one of the main destination parks in Nowra. The CISP identifies Marriott Park as a “Regional Recreation Park” and recommends the development of a Master Plan, including a pathway network. The development of the Playspace is also consistent with Council’s resolution (MIN20.405) that categorises Marriott Park as a “Destination Park”.

The Marriott Park Master Plan and the Livvi’s Place Inclusive Playspace are in line with the recommendations and actions detailed the CISP, and its categorisation as a Destination Park.

 

Financial Implications

The funding received under Everyone Can Play is $300,000 with a Council contribution of another $300,000 from an existing Community Planning and Projects budget.

The Draft Budget for the 2021/22 Financial Year identifies further funding for the investigation and detailed design of the Playspace and other elements in the park. Once this aspect is completed the funding to date will allow for the delivery of stage one of this Playspace, with further elements of the Playspace being funded in subsequent years of Council capital works program.

 

Next Steps

Upon the approval and finalisation of the funding agreement, Council staff will go out to tender for the detailed design and construction of Stage 1 of the Marriott Park Master Plan, which involves the delivery of the Variety Livvi’s Place Inclusive Playspace.

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.68     Feasibility Report - Provision of Sewer to Tomerong Village

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/85066

 

Department:       Water Asset Planning & Development

Approver:           Robert Horner, Executive Manager Shoalhaven Water  

Reason for Report

The CEO has submitted a Significant Non Pecuniary Interest declaration in relation to this item. This report has been approved by the Director – City Services.

Council at its Strategy & Assets Committee meeting on the 10 November 2020 resolved (MIN20.819) as follows:

That the CEO (Executive Manager, Shoalhaven Water):

1.    Undertake a feasibility study into the provision of a sewerage scheme to Tomerong village and environs that will:

a.    Reduce the amount of nutrient finding its way into St Georges Basin.

b.    Promote a healthier village environment.

c.    Connect to the St Georges Basin Treatment Plant to facilitate a connection with the Reclaimed Water Management Scheme to enable an increase to the amount of irrigation water available to farmers.

2.    Report to Council when the study is completed and such report include the possibility of the proposal being part funded by grant source(s).

This report is in response to that Notice of Motion.

 

Recommendation

That Council include $7.3 million for the Tomerong Sewerage Scheme (as a pressure sewer scheme) in the Sewer Capital Works Program, for completion in the 2028/29 financial year based on the following:

1.    Design of the scheme to commence in 2026/27 and construction commence in 2027/28,

2.    Noting that the scheme is not currently funded, review the sewer availability charge as part of the 2022/23 DPOP preparation to ensure the project is accommodated in the Long Term Financial Plan,

3.    Shoalhaven Water to seek grant funding to assist with the financing of the scheme.

 

 

Options

1.    As recommended. Provide a pressure sewer system to the village zoned properties in Tomerong, for completion in 2028/29.

Implications: The estimated cost of the project is approximately $7.3 million (2021). The project is not currently included in the 20 year Capital Program and therefore not funded, thus requiring a review of the sewer availability charge moving forward.

 

2.    Proceed with the Tomerong Sewerage Scheme in a different year than has been nominated in this report.

Implications: Sewer availability charges will need review in line with a nominated revised program. Should Council wish to bring this project forward then it would need to determine which project(s) to defer from the current program.

 

3.    Not proceed with the scheme and continue with the current onsite management of sewage within the village.

Implications: On-site sewage management facilities would continue to be utilised within the village under the existing management regime by Council’s City Development Directorate.

 

Background

It is understood that Council has received representations from the members of the Tomerong community regarding the provision of a reticulated sewerage scheme to serve the Village.

In response to Council’s Resolution of 10 November 2020 Shoalhaven Water has proceeded with a feasibility study for the provision of a pressure sewer system for the Tomerong Village. The decision to base the feasibility on a pressure sewer system in lieu of a gravity system is due to the topography of the area, the existing built environment, and the ability to monitor sewer flow activity within the scheme.

Pressure sewer systems specialist Pressure System Solutions Pty Ltd (PSS) were engaged to undertake the feasibility study for the servicing of Tomerong Village. PSS has extensive experience with designing Shoalhaven pressure sewer schemes, having completed designs for Lake Tabourie, Lake Conjola, Currarong, Kangaroo Valley and more recently the Woollamia and St Andrews Way schemes. For the purpose of the feasibility, the extent of the scheme was defined by the village zoned area and is shown below. The full extent would require confirmation as part of the scheme development, including community consultation.

This Report also provides a recommendation as to a suitable timing for the project, should Council resolve to proceed with it. The basis of the timing follows consideration of the current capital works commitment, resource allocation to current projects and the minimisation of any rise in the sewer availability charge. 

 


Figure 1: Proposed Sewer Service Area

 

The objectives of the study were to examine the feasibility of a sewerage system servicing all properties within the RU5 zoned area (approximately 164 existing properties and 10 vacant lots), discharging to the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) located in The Wool Road, St Georges Basin, and to provide indicative costs for the project.

 

Feasibility Study Findings

The study assessed two strategy options as follows:

1. Provision of a pressure sewer system that would discharge directly to the STP utilising the onsite pump units (similar to the Kangaroo Valley scheme),

2. Provision of a pressure sewer system discharging to the STP via a booster pumping station and rising main (similar to the Lake Tabourie Scheme).

Hydraulic modelling of the two options demonstrated that it was not feasible for the pressure sewer system to discharge directly to the STP due to excessive pressure losses experienced over the 6.5km length from the Village to the STP. Option 2 was determined as feasible, subject to environmental studies and other statutory approvals required.

The preferred option is shown in Figure 2 below.


Figure 2: Pressure Sewer Concept Design

 

 

The recommended strategy is to provide a booster pumping station, indicatively located near the intersection of McGuire Way and Hawkens Road, with a dedicated rising main extending to the STP. The locations of infrastructure will require confirmation through the investigation and consultation phases of the project.

 

Financial Implications

The following summarises the costs associated with the provision of a pressure sewer scheme to Tomerong Village, a booster pumping station and rising main connecting to the St Georges Basin STP. These estimated costs are subject to change as the project proceeds through more detailed investigations.

·    Tomerong Village Pressure Sewage System = $3,340,815

·    Booster Sewage Pumping Station and Rising Main = $2,940,250

·    Survey/Design/Investigation = $410,000

·    Construction/Project Management = $600,000

 

Total Project Estimate = $7,291,065 (equates to approximately $42,000 per property)

 

Note: All costs above are exclusive of GST.

 

The primary source of grant funding for major water and sewerage infrastructure projects is through the State Government’s Safe and Secure Water Program, managed by the Department of Primary Industry and Environment (DPIE). Funding under the scheme is allocated according to a risk-based priority framework. 

Under the current assessment criteria, the Tomerong Sewerage Scheme has not been identified as a priority scheme. Some initial feedback was sought from DPIE in October 2020 which indicated that Tomerong onsite management facilities did not present a high risk when compared to other projects throughout NSW.

Given the proposed timing for the project Council will have opportunities to undertake more detailed risk assessments associated with the scheme, with a view to raising the priority level of the project and potentially attract funding. 

 

 


 

 Strategy and Assets Committee – Tuesday 13 April 2021

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SA21.69     Shoalhaven Water Reclamation Annual Report 2019-20

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/102117

 

Department:       Water Operations & Maintenance

Approver:           Robert Horner, Executive Manager Shoalhaven Water  

Attachments:     1.  Reclamation Annual Report 2019 - 2020 (under separate cover)   

Reason for Report

As part of the consent conditions for the Northern Reclaimed Water Management Scheme (known as REMS), annual reporting of the Scheme’s performance is required.  Further, an undertaking was made to the community that Council would monitor and report to it on health and environmental aspects of the Scheme.  Since the inception of REMS 1A in 2001, the Annual Report has been expanded to include reclaimed water use and biosolids management from each of Council’s sewerage schemes.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council note the Shoalhaven Water Reclamation Annual Report 2019/20, and endorse its distribution to key stakeholders and make it available on Council’s website.

 

 

Options

1.    As recommended.

Implications: The Annual Report is circulated to various interested parties and stakeholders as well as being made available on the website.

 

2.    The Committee could request further information on Council’s water reclamation schemes

Implications: Further advice from staff could be provided.

 

Background

The Annual Report, incorporating all reclaimed water management activities with performance highlights, has been prepared (see attachment).

In summary:

·        Shoalhaven City Council is involved in water reclamation schemes at most of its thirteen wastewater treatment plants involving re-use on 33 properties.

·        The largest scheme is the Northern Shoalhaven Reclaimed Water Management Scheme (REMS) involving six wastewater treatment plants and re-use on 25 properties.

·        During 2019/20 approximately 2,310ML of reclaimed water was beneficially re-used from all schemes in the Shoalhaven, 31% of all reclaimed water produced.

·        The REMS Stage 1A entered its eighteenth year of operation with 78% of scheme output beneficially re-used with the surplus released to Penguin Head. This percentage is above the long-term average rate of re-use for the REMS due to the high demand during the 2019/20 drought and fires. 

·        There was approximately 360ML of the REMS water recycled for dairy yard wash down and stock drinking in 2019/20, replacing previous usage of potable water for these purposes.

·        Each of the water reclamation schemes met its water quality targets with respect to disinfection of reclaimed water.

·        Approximately 1,240 tonnes of processed, dewatered biosolids were applied to farmland during 2019/20 in accordance with NSW Government environmental guidelines.

·        Environmental monitoring undertaken as part of the REMS, Shoalhaven Heads, Ulladulla and Conjola sewerage schemes found no significant adverse outcomes.

·        REMS stage 1B works were completed including the upgrade of Nowra and Bomaderry wastewater treatment plants (WwTPs) and their integration into the REMS distribution system.

·        Ultraviolet disinfection systems have been constructed to increase disinfection performance at the Callala, Culburra and Vincentia WwTPs in line with current water recycling guidelines.

·        Designs have been completed for a reclaimed transfer main from the Sussex Inlet WwTP to the local golf course with construction due to occur in late 2020

·        Designs are also underway for an expansion of the REMS Bulk Storage (REMS Stage 2) with construction subject to grant funding availability

The 2019/20 Water Reclamation Annual Report highlights Council’s commitment to the promotion of the beneficial reuse of treated wastewater (reclaimed water) and the solids removed during the treatment process (biosolids). The REMS scheme, together with Council’s other reuse schemes, can promote sustainable development by:

‒    Protecting the environment

‒    Reducing the demand for potable water supplies

‒    Promoting local economic development

‒    Directly involving the community in water conservation

For each reclamation project, Council has established procedures to ensure the water recycling activity complies with NSW and Commonwealth guidelines.

The annual report meets the requirements of the environmental monitoring plan for Council’s reuse schemes.

 

Community Engagement

The Annual Report is circulated to various interested parties and stakeholders as well as being made available on Council’s website. Engagement with key stakeholders as well as the broader community is an ongoing part of the REMS project.

Extensive community consultation was undertaken as part of the REMS 1B construction program. The past, present and future commitment of Shoalhaven Council to the scheme is an excellent example of Council’s leadership in this field. 

 

 


 

Strategy and Assets Committee – 13 April 2021

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SA21.70     Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology - National Performance Report 2019/20 Urban Water Utilities

 

HPERM Ref:       D21/107858

 

Department:       Water Business Services

Approver:           Robert Horner, Executive Manager Shoalhaven Water  

Reason for Report

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the performance outcomes for Shoalhaven Water following the National Performance Report (NPR) 2019-20 for Urban Water Utilities. The NPR is a comprehensive “report card” released in February 2021, that enables benchmarking against other Water Authorities/Utilities.

 

Recommendation (Item to be determined under delegated authority)

That Council receive the Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology National Performance Report 2019-20 for Urban Water Utilities for information be received for information in accordance with the Committee’s delegated authority from Council.

 

 

Options

1.    Council could seek additional information on any of the indicator results.

 

Background

The Shoalhaven Water Customer Service Plan outlines water and wastewater customer services and responsibilities in accordance with the legislative framework for Local Government Water Utilities in NSW. The NPR 2019-20 for Urban Water Utilities produced by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) benchmarks the performance of 85 urban water service providers, comprising 80 water utilities and 5 bulk water suppliers, against a range of indicators covering water resources, pricing, environment, finance, assets, health, and customer service.

Performance monitoring and benchmarking of Council’s Water Supply and Sewerage businesses is required under the terms of the National Water Initiative (NWI) and is facilitated by the BOM. The BOM specifies the criteria by which Water Utilities are monitored and the results are tabled publicly each year. 

This report is provided to Council following initial analysis of the results and as a summary of the Shoalhaven Water performance against that of the 24 comparative sized utilities. 14 of these utilities are in NSW of which Shoalhaven Water is the largest.

Utilities – Grouped by Size

For the purpose of NPR, the contributing utilities are grouped by number of connected properties. The utility groups used are:

Group

Number Connected Properties

Major

100,000+

Large

50,000 to 100,000

Medium

20,000 to 50,000

Small

10,000 to 20,000

 

With 49,800 connected properties, Shoalhaven is the largest of all Medium Utilities nationally. With steady growth, it is likely that in the coming years, Shoalhaven will move into the Large Utilities reporting group. Comparative analysis of Shoalhaven’s performance against both Medium and Large Utilities has therefore been included in this report to give an indication of performance against both current and future reporting peers.

Similar sized utilities in Medium Utility group include:

 

Water Utility

Number Connected Properties

Shoalhaven City Council

49,800

Mackay Regional Council (Qld)

46,100

Wannon Water (Vic)

43,600

Mid-Coast Council (NSW)

39,400

Fraser Coast Regional Council (Qld)

38,700

Lower Murray Water Corp. (Vic)

34,300

 

Indicators

The National Performance Report is designed to outline water consumption trends and 166 indicators relating to the performance of the urban water industry to:

•        Provide nationally consistent definitions and approaches which enable realistic comparisons to be made,

•           Inform customers about the level of service they are receiving,

•           Build community confidence and improve the water literacy of the community,

•        Inform the decision-making processes of government, regulatory agencies, and water businesses, and

•           Encourage greater transparency in the way water is managed.

The indicators used in the 2019-20 NPR are contained within 7 broad headings.


1.   Water resources

2.   Pricing

3.   Finance

4.   Customer

5.   Asset

6.   Environment

7.   Health


 

An example of the result for Shoalhaven within each of the headings has been extracted from the published report as indicated below, together with commentary as applicable to support the results across the suite of indicators.

 

WATER RESOURCES

W12 - Average Annual Residential Water Supplied (kL/property)

The average annual residential water supplied indicator (W12) reports the average volume (kL/property) of water supplied to residential properties during the reporting year.

The average volume is influenced by a number of factors, including:

·        climate

·        rainfall

·        water conservation measures (for example, water restrictions)

·        availability of water supply

·        housing density; and

·        water prices.

The 2019-20 year saw variable weather conditions as well as devastating bushfires. Whilst there were 71 days of Level 1 water restrictions due to drought conditions, water consumption in 2019-20 increased by 6.2%. At 155kL/property, ours was in the mid-range consumption level across all Medium Utilities.

 

Table 1 W12 - Average Annual Residential Water Supplied (kL/property)

Performance Comparison – Medium Utility Group

Utility

2019-2020

2018-2019

2017-2018

% Change

Lower Murray Urban and Rural Water Corp

519.9

518.5

490.0

0.3%

Rockhampton Regional Council

382.7

375.0

342.7

2.1%

Riverina Water County Council

338.0

343.0

311.0

-1.5%

Bundaberg Regional Council

260.8

243.3

217.5

7.2%

Gladstone Regional Council

251.4

239.0

132.5

5.2%

Albury City Council

246.0

252.0

237.0

-2.4%

Grampians Wimmera Mallee Water Corp

240.7

248.8

316.4

-3.3%

Wingecarribee Shire Council

218.0

206.0

216.0

5.8%

Mackay Regional Council

215.3

186.8

180.2

15.3%

Dubbo Regional Council

207.0

337.0

386.0

-38.6%

Fraser Coast Regional Council

191.1

185.9

163.8

2.8%

Tweed Shire Council

177.0

177.0

176.0

0.0%

Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council

171.0

158.0

167.0

8.2%

Shoalhaven City Council

155.0

146.0

157.0

6.2%

East Gippsland Region Water Corporation

152.9

160.0

157.4

-4.4%

Coffs Harbour City Council

151.0

154.0

170.0

-1.9%

Mid Coast Council

144.0

155.0

142.0

-7.1%

Port Macquarie-Hastings Council

144.0

160.0

172.0

-10.0%

Wannon Water

141.2

147.2

144.1

-4.1%

Tamworth Regional Council

141.0

247.0

291.0

-42.9%

Eurobodalla Shire Council

121.0

121.0

123.0

0.0%

South Gippsland Region Water Corporation

115.0

119.5

118.5

-3.7%

Clarence Valley Council

115.0

159.0

155.0

-27.7%

 

GROUP AVERAGE - MEDIUM

208.7

219.1

215.9

-4.8%

GROUP AVERAGE - LARGE

226.0

228.7

214.9

-1.2%

NATIONAL AVERAGE

209.3

218.3

217.6

-4.1%

 


 

W26 Recycled Water Supplied (Total Volume - ML)

W26 - Total recycled water supplied is the sum of all treated sewage effluent used by the utility and its customers. It includes residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and environmental use as well as onsite use by the utility.

Shoalhaven recorded a modest increase in use of recycled water for 2019-20.  Further increases are probable due to the completion of REMS 1B and the planned REMS Stage 2 Dam.

 

Table 2W26 Total volume of recycled water supplied (ML)

Performance Comparison – Medium Utility Group

Utility

2019-2020

2018-2019

2017-2018

% Change

Fraser Coast Regional Council

6918

5591

4739

24%

Mackay Regional Council

4034

4263

4263

-5%

Tamworth Regional Council

3622

4563

4060

-21%

Albury City Council

3297

2457

3885

34%

Gladstone Regional Council

2494

3174

3166

-21%

Shoalhaven City Council

2218

2185

2289

2%

Dubbo Regional Council

2159

2448

3043

-12%

Wannon Water

1725

2008

1779

-14%

MidCoast Council

1398

1432

1290

-2%

Coffs Harbour City Council

1281

965

1650

33%

East Gippsland Region Water Corporation

1072

1139

2774

-6%

Tweed Shire Council

874

879

852

-1%

Rockhampton Regional Council

735

717

755

3%

Port Macquarie-Hastings Council

610

440

400

39%

Bundaberg Regional Council

585

533

352

10%

Eurobodalla Shire Council

433

239

228

81%

Lower Murray Urban and Rural Water Corp

408

483

387

-16%

Clarence Valley Council

386

376

376

3%

Wingecarribee Shire Council

171

186

179

-8%

South Gippsland Region Water Corporation

122

111

108

10%

Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council

70

70

70

0%

Grampians Wimmera Mallee Water Corp

0

2569

2147

-100%

Wagga Wagga City Council

no data

4986

5008

n.a.

 

 

 

 

 

GROUP AVERAGE - MEDIUM

1573.3

1818.0

1904.3

-13.5%

GROUP AVERAGE - LARGE

2126.5

2327.2

2274.5

-8.6%

NATIONAL AVERAGE

3179

3100.8

2965.4

2.5%

 

PRICING

There are various indicators by which utilities are measured on pricing. This can include straight charge comparisons or total customer bills based on the utility residential average or a universal 200kL of water use.

P3 – Typical Residential Bill – Water - based on average residential annual water supplied.

In 2019-20 Shoalhaven again recorded the most affordable annual residential bill (water) at $354.55, noting that this modest increase reflects the 2% increase in average water consumed.

The result again places Shoalhaven as having the lowest annual residential bill for water supply across all measured utilities nationally.

 

Table 3 - P3 – Typical Residential Bill ($) – water

Performance Comparison – Medium Utility Group

Utility

2019-2020

2018-2019

2017-2018

% Change

Shoalhaven City Council

$354.55

$335.17

$358.95

6%

Wannon Water

$379.84

$379.20

$373.21

0%

Clarence Valley Council

$407.20

$515.24

$506.09

-21%

Tamworth Regional Council

$497.01

$654.98

$721.13

-24%

Albury City Council

$506.01

$526.83

$510.22

-4%

Lower Murray Urban and Rural Water Corp

$521.17

$526.33

$502.93

-1%

South Gippsland Region Water Corp

$526.50